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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 974 0 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 442 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 288 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 246 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 216 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 192 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2 166 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 146 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 144 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 136 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 4, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) or search for Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

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same as ours. No aggression can come upon us, which will not be visited upon them, and whatever our action may be, it should be of that character which will bear us blameless to posterity, should the step be fatal to the interests of those States. The London times on the Southern Confederacy. The London Times, of the 18th ultimo, has a long article on the "impending crisis" in America. It says: If South Carolina secedes, if Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, Louisiana follow, if a Southern federation be formed, and take its place among the Powers of the earth, there can be no hope of keeping the border slave States. These will be drawn by a natural affinity to detach themselves from the North, and join the slaveholding federa- tion. North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, will then be dissociated from the free States. Such an event cannot be regarded without dismay by the most staunch Abolitionist. It would, in
The Daily Dispatch: February 4, 1861., [Electronic resource], The seizure of the New Orleans Mint, &c. (search)
The seizure of the New Orleans Mint, &c. There can be no doubt of the truth of the seizure of the New Orleans mint and customhouse by the Louisiana revolutionists, that comes this morning by telegraph. To-day, the Treasury Department were notified by Adams & Co.'s express, that A. J. Guirot, the Superintendent of the New Orleans mint, and Assistant United States Treasurer there, had refused to pay a draft of the Department for $300,000, placed in their hands for transfer to Philadelphia. It is supposed at the Department, that in these seizures a million of the money of the Government have fallen into the hands of the revolutionists. Guirot's answer, on the presentation of the draft, was that "the money in his custody was no longer the property of the United States, but of the Republic of Louisiana."--Washington Star, Saturday.
The Daily Dispatch: February 4, 1861., [Electronic resource], The Canadians Incensed at the interference of England in the extradition case. (search)
ves Messrs. Rham, Talbot. Archer and Anderson orders for machinery, and thus enables them to pay you your wages? The South--the Railroad Presidents, the Sugar Planters and Cotton Growers of the South. Where would you be, and where would the manufactures of Richmond be, without the patronage of the South? You, in this monetary crisis, would now be idle on the streets, and Richmond lose her position as the manufacturing city of the South. Do our manufacturers get any orders from the North? Why did the Lester Sewing Machine establishment locate itself in this Southern town? Above all, what will be the effect upon the minds of Southern men, in Louisiana, Georgia. Alabama, &c., when they see submissionists elected from a city whose very existence is dependent upon Southern traffic and Southern patronage? Ponder on these things, and you cannot fail to appreciate and act upon your honest convictions. Anvil. Are not the Northern manufacturers your rivals and competitors? fe 4--1t