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William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 1,765 1 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 1,301 9 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 947 3 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 914 0 Browse Search
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House 776 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 495 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 485 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 456 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 410 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 405 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 23, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Abraham Lincoln or search for Abraham Lincoln in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 6 document sections:

March, he will be her head and we shall be his staff. The Black Republicans know how to keep their own secrets, or they never could have surprised the whole world so completely and delightfully as in this President of theirs and ours, this Abraham Lincoln, who, in the midst of universal agony, has caused the whole nation to rear with laughter, to hold its sides, to cry with convulsive mirth instead of sorrow, and to stare with all its eyes, and wonder, like the sailor blown up by the powder m, or of any President we ever had, squaring away at some noted pugilist! To have the independence and rights of the South sacrificed by a subtle and polished demagogue like Seward, would be bad enough, in all conscience; but to be subjugated by this Passional, Pugilistic, Capillary Lincoln! Like the honest Dutchman who died from the effects of an assault and battery by a pugnacious ram, we "don't mint being kilt so much, but to be butted to death by a tam sheep," is past all human endurance.
Observance of Washington's birth-day. New York,Feb. 22.--The weather to-day has been clear and mild. Flags were displayed throughout the city, and the military were out. Salutes were fired in the morning from various points, and at noon 500 guns were fired on the battery. Alexandria,Feb. 22.--The day was observed as a general holiday. There was a full military parade; flags were displayed and salutes fired. Baltimore,Feb. 22.--The day was generally observed as a holiday in this city. Salutes were fired at day break. Philadelphia,Feb. 22.--The celebration commenced at daybreak this morning, by the firing of salutes. At seven o'clock, Lincoln raised a flag of 34 stars, on the platform, in Independence Square. The working men turned out in immense numbers to join the procession.
The Daily Dispatch: February 23, 1861., [Electronic resource], Attempted Suicide during the Royal procession. (search)
ted States Government has ever been called upon to make. As Congress is the war-making power, and as Congress will not authorize a war upon the seceded States, Mr. Lincoln will be restricted to pacific measures, at least till the next Congress, until provocations from the Southern Confederacy shall authorize a war. We do not, therefore, apprehend a war between the two divisions of the Union; nor do we expect that Mr. Lincoln, in his inaugural address, will counsel any warlike measures." If the counsels of the conservative branch of the Republicans prevail, there will be no war. But Mr. Lincoln has escaped from the straight jacket in which he was confinpublicans prevail, there will be no war. But Mr. Lincoln has escaped from the straight jacket in which he was confined in Springfield, and is thought to meditate mischief. The Force wing of the Republicans seem to have him under their control, and, if they can raise the sinews of war, will make an attempt to subjugate the South.
The Daily Dispatch: February 23, 1861., [Electronic resource], Attempted Suicide during the Royal procession. (search)
Lincoln's views. Philadelphia,Feb. 22.--Lincoln, in a speech this morning, at Independence Hall, made some important points. He said the country could be saved only by the principles contained in the Declaration of Independence, which gave Liberty not alone to the people of this country, but the world, for all future time. Lincoln, in a speech this morning, at Independence Hall, made some important points. He said the country could be saved only by the principles contained in the Declaration of Independence, which gave Liberty not alone to the people of this country, but the world, for all future time. If the country cannot be saved without giving up this principle, he would rather be assassinated than surrender it. In his view of the present aspect of affairs, there was no need of bloodshed or war. He was not in favor of such a course, and would say, in advance, that there would be no bloodshed, unless it was forced upon the Govsurrender it. In his view of the present aspect of affairs, there was no need of bloodshed or war. He was not in favor of such a course, and would say, in advance, that there would be no bloodshed, unless it was forced upon the Government as an act of self-defence. Mr. Lincoln left, for Harrisburg, at 9 o'clock this morning.
Secession at the North. The New York Herald says that the Legislature of Louisiana, in the resolution which has been introduced in that body inviting the Southern portions of Indiana and Illinois, which gave heavy majorities against Lincoln, to enter the Southern Confederacy, has opened the door for non-slaveholding States. But the line, it thinks, might be extended further, and include parts of New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. The Herald says: "A part of New York and Pennsylvania, and the whole of New Jersey, which it would not be worth while to dissect, might very probably like to join the Southern Confederacy, too. This is a proper subject for the Southern Congress at Montgomery to take up. They have already opened the question by their resolution admitting other States not yet included in the "Confederate States of America" to come in if they are willing to subscribe to the Constitution."
War Feeling in Louisiana. Baton Rouge,Feb. 19.--Since Mr. Lincoln's late speech, foreshadowing coercion a policy, war is deemed inevitable. No apprehensions are felt of the conflict in the South. On the first demonstration by the Lincoln Government the Provisional Government will send immediately a large army to the North. The South will never wait to be invaded. One hundred thousand dollars were asked for to-day in the Legislature to put the forts on the Mississippi in complete defence. An appropriation bill amounting so one million five hundred thousand dollars passed the House.