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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 197 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 111 21 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 97 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 91 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 71 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 68 12 Browse Search
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death. 62 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 60 4 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 56 26 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 23, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Montgomery (Alabama, United States) or search for Montgomery (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: February 23, 1861., [Electronic resource], Inauguration of the first President of the Southern Republic. (search)
Inauguration of the first President of the Southern Republic. A correspondent of the Charleston News, writing from Montgomery, sends that paper an interesting account of the inauguration of the first President of the Southern Confederacy: The whole town was in holiday attire, the stores all closed, beautiful ladies gaily attired, scores of the rougher sex — some in the shiny broadcloth of the "cit"-- others in rough, but neat country garb, with ebony faces and kinky heads without number, thronged the streets, crowded the windows and balconies of the adjacent buildings, and jostled each other in the fast-gathering crowd, vehicles of all sorts and descriptions, equestrians on high-spirited, mettlesome steeds, dashing here and there, exhibiting their grace or awkwardness as the case might be, made up a moving panorama of beauty and interest, and afforded infinite amusement to the pleased looker-on. At 1 o'clock the line of procession was formed, first, the President, with the
Secession at the North. The New York Herald says that the Legislature of Louisiana, in the resolution which has been introduced in that body inviting the Southern portions of Indiana and Illinois, which gave heavy majorities against Lincoln, to enter the Southern Confederacy, has opened the door for non-slaveholding States. But the line, it thinks, might be extended further, and include parts of New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. The Herald says: "A part of New York and Pennsylvania, and the whole of New Jersey, which it would not be worth while to dissect, might very probably like to join the Southern Confederacy, too. This is a proper subject for the Southern Congress at Montgomery to take up. They have already opened the question by their resolution admitting other States not yet included in the "Confederate States of America" to come in if they are willing to subscribe to the Constitution."