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The Daily Dispatch: March 12, 1861., [Electronic resource], Condition of the Federal Army in Texas. (search)
believes it would be useless to send less than fifteen or twenty thousand men to Charleston harbor. This number would be able to silence their batteries and other means of defence, and successfully reinforce Sumter with men and supplies. "Both arms, the Army and Navy, of the Government will be actively employed for some time to come in carrying out the policy of the new Administration. Orders to this effect have, it is believed, already been issued: and it was for this reason that Colonel Cooper. Adjutant General, through whose department all orders have to be issued, resigned his position in the army. There will be other resignations of distinguished officers when this matter is fully known." Again, we ask, will the Legislature adjourn and leave the State defenseless? In the language of the Examiner: "We are standing on the uttermost edge of a great precipice and do not know the moment we shall be toppled over. When armies are about to act they do not publish the
The Daily Dispatch: March 12, 1861., [Electronic resource], The truth about "Sam Patch"--his last leap. (search)
. Referring to this subject, on which we commented yesterday, a contemporary says: "Among the more recent and significant resignations are those of Adj't Gen. Cooper and Capt. Geo. W. Lay. The former position is one of the most desirable in the whole army. No man stood higher as an officer than Adjutant Gen. Cooper, CapAdjutant Gen. Cooper, Capt. Lay has been justly regarded as one of the most accomplished officers of the army, and has been long known as the principal Aide-de-camp of Gen. Scott. Gen. Cooper is married to a Virginia lady, and his associations are principally with the South, Capt. Lay is a native Virginian. Both these gentlemen have resigned, not becauseGen. Cooper is married to a Virginia lady, and his associations are principally with the South, Capt. Lay is a native Virginian. Both these gentlemen have resigned, not because their States have seceded, as is the case with others, but because being certain, from the position they held, that they would soon be called on to aid in the conduct of hostile proceedings against the South, they preferred throwing up their commissions to embarking in such a war. "These acts bear no ordinary significance. T