Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 25, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Green or search for Green in all documents.

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Green peas and snow. --Green peas are the newest luxury in Charleston. A citizen has been picking them from his own vines for three weeks past. They had a snow there on Friday last which covered the ground to the depth of six inches. Green peas and snow. --Green peas are the newest luxury in Charleston. A citizen has been picking them from his own vines for three weeks past. They had a snow there on Friday last which covered the ground to the depth of six inches.
wards his support, and at once advances to the charge. Bowing politely, with a smirk upon his pinched face, he accosts Mr. Green: "Ah! dear sir, how d'ye do? Glad to see you, really; believe I have not yet had the honor. Your name is — a — is — ah! (waits for Mr. Green to announce it.) "Green, my name is, sir." "Ah! yes! of course: Green; of — a — of — ah — of — where did you say?" "Of Massachusetts, sir." "Ah, yes! exactly, of Massachusetts, yes! large family of you in that StGreen, my name is, sir." "Ah! yes! of course: Green; of — a — of — ah — of — where did you say?" "Of Massachusetts, sir." "Ah, yes! exactly, of Massachusetts, yes! large family of you in that State. Yes! of course! my name is Hickman, Beau Hickman! heard of me, of course!--known all over the world — reside in Washington — man of large influence here; be very happy to be of service, and — ah — I ah — by the way, you'll excuse me, it's a Green; of — a — of — ah — of — where did you say?" "Of Massachusetts, sir." "Ah, yes! exactly, of Massachusetts, yes! large family of you in that State. Yes! of course! my name is Hickman, Beau Hickman! heard of me, of course!--known all over the world — reside in Washington — man of large influence here; be very happy to be of service, and — ah — I ah — by the way, you'll excuse me, it's a way I have, the custom here, always, among gentlemen, among gentlemen! to ah — to — in short, to contribute — that is, I usually collect a small tax — not much — mere trifle — dollar or tw
hangings, and persons are made sick with the symptoms of arsenical poisoning by sleeping in rooms papered with such paper. Many cases have come to the knowledge of Dr. Jackson, in which he has detected the poison on the paper. In one recent case, a lady, latter cutting out the figures on 90 yards of green border paper, was severely poisoned, suffering all the symptoms of poisoning by arsenic. Dr. Jackson says that the high-colored confectionery is also colored with poisonous matters. Green arsenical pigments, chrome yellow, and vermillion, are frequently employed for this purpose. Glazed visiting cards are incrusted with white lead, a slow poison. All poisonous preparations ought to be prohibited by law in confectionery, and also in the preparation of cards, tickets, and paper hangings, as equally handsome colors may be obtained with safe materials. Dr. Jackson gives the following simple test of green color in paper hangings: "Since there is another green used in paper