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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16,340 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 3,098 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2,132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,974 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,668 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,628 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,386 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,340 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 1,170 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 1,092 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 25, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for United States (United States) or search for United States (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 12 document sections:

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e adjournment on yesterday. He recapitulated the position that the present territory of the United States was unsuited to slave labor, while there was in the South such a deficiency as to lead to tht, was expressed in one section of the report of the Committee, that "the Territories of the United States constitutes a trust, to be administered by the General Government, for the common benefit of the people of the United States, and any policy in respect to such Territories calculated to confer greater benefits on the people of one part of the United States than on the people of another partUnited States than on the people of another part, is contrary to equality and prejudicial to the rights of some for whose equal benefit the trust was created. If the equal admission of slave labor and free labor into any Territory, excites unfrie necessary for its proper development." He contended that no species of property in the United States should have more protection than the peculiar property of Virginia. He claimed full and per
such increase can only be regarded as a menace and threat to this Commonwealth. 2. Resolved, That the Governor be requested to adopt immediate measures for obtaining information as to the purpose of the Executive of the General Government with respect to strengthening the military force in the arsenals, docks and fortifications within the limits of this Commonwealth. 3. Resolved, That the Governor of this Commonwealth communicate the foregoing resolutions to the President of the United States. By Mr. Brannon, Resolved, by the General Assembly, That the Governor, in order more effectually to carry out the provisions of an act passed the 21st day of January, 1860, entitled an act making appropriations for the purchase and manufacture of arms and munitions of war, be and he is hereby authorized to contract with one or more persons for the manufacture and repair of arms at the Armory, it, in his opinion, it will best promote the interest of the Commonwealth; and if suc
The Daily Dispatch: March 25, 1861., [Electronic resource], Another speech of Vice President Stephens. (search)
Another speech of Vice President Stephens. Vice President Stephens addressed the citizens of Savannah, Ga., on Wednesday night. The Republican, in a sketch of his speech, says: He contrasted the strength of the Confederate States with that of the Colonies at the time of their struggle for independence, and showed that we had more territory, more wealth, and more men than our fathers had when they asserted and maintained their independence. Our perfect system of government would attract the border slave States, and we would soon have more States, but even if they choose to stay where they are in the old Union, we still had territory enough for an empire — more than twice as much as some of the most powerful nations in Europe, with a soil and climate and productions superior to any in the world. With a good government and a brave, virtuous and intelligent people, we had nothing to fear. With less public debt than the Northern States, we have greater resources, and were bet
en at the spring election, as to whether Virginia shall go North or South. W. B. Gates, Esq., offered the following resolution, prefacing it with the remark that, as he did not vote for Mr. Dejarnette, he took greater pleasure in expressing at this time and place his satisfaction at the course pursued by him, especially in regard to the great question of the day: Resolved, That we approve of the course of the Hon. D. C. Dejarnette, our representative in the Congress of the late United States, especially in regard to all questions relating to the separation of our State from the Federal Union; and laying aside all the old distinction of parties, we fully endorse the sentiments which he has expressed on this occasion, and deeply regret that they are not fully acted up to by the Convention now in session in Richmond. The resolution was adopted unanimously. On motion of Mr. Edwin Williams, it was Resolved, That the thanks of this meeting be tendered to the Hon. Mr
nator from Ohio, took his seat. Hon. Wm. L. Dayton, the new Minister to France, has appointed the Son of Mr. Speaker Pennington as his Secretary of Legation. A man in Bridgeport has sold Barnum a Tom Thumb dog that weighs but three ounces. It was an English terrier, and sold for $100. The census of the Sandwich Islands for 1860 shows a decrease of 3,955 native, and an increase of 598 foreign population since 1853. Col. James Anderson, recently deceased, was appointed United States Pension Agent in Pittsburgh on the very day of his death. Lieut. Slemmer, the Commandant at Fort Pickens, it is said, is to be promoted for "courage, zeal and efficiency." Dr. George Wilkins, a dentist, committed suicide in Boston, on Wednesday, by taking strychnine at Dooley's Hotel. The dwelling of Mr. Wallace Cave, of Orange county, Va., was consumed by fire on the 15th. Loss $4,000. The steamer Powhatan has arrived off Pensacola, making the fifth war vessel now s
Government, and to liquidate present and prospective liabilities of the State, in which he recommends an increased rate of taxation equal to 60 cents on every hundred dollars' value of property, and on every other subject in the same proportion. The bill concerning the Covington and Ohio Railroad was made the order of the day for Wednesday next, at 11 o'clock. Joint resolutions were offered and laid over, under the rules, declaring, first, that it is inexpedient and unnecessary for the United States to make any addition to its military or naval forces in this State at the present time; second, that such addition can only be regarded as a menace or threat to Virginia; third, authorizing the Governor, in order to carry out the provisions of existing laws, to contract with one or more persons for the manufacture and repair of arms at the Armory; fourth, suspending all loans or subscriptions to works of internal improvement until the General Assembly shall otherwise order.--Sundry bills
om. The figurative "old mistress" is Columbia, no longer, alas! a happy land, who, with blind confidence, places her fate in the hands of — of whom? Who is the second metaphorical personage? No other than Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States. The significant title, "Weaver," has been, from time immemorial, applied to spiders, and from them transferred to politicians--"weavers" of cunning plots. The name, William, is added partly for the sake of alliteration, and partly (as Dixie." Can any one now fail to see that, in the verses of this deservedly popular song, an epitome is given of the events which, since last November, have shaken this land? The election of Lincoln, the decay and dismemberment of the United States, the threats of civil war, and the rise of a new power in the South, are all foretold, and even an invitation to join this nascent empire extended to the surrounding States! The most skeptical must at least confess that these verses contain
The Southern Confederacy. --The Montgomery Advertiser publishes a list of the officers appointed in the Confederate army.--Among them are the following from Virginia: Captains, Wm. G. Gill, Ed. J. Harvie, John Scott; Lieuts., Fitzhugh Lee, Robt. F. Beckham, Geo. W. Carr. The following statement embraces the aggregate appropriation for each department of the Government of the Confederate States: Legislative, $35,740; Executive, $33,050; Department of State, $44,200; Treasury Department, $70,800; War Department, $59,000; Navy Department, $17,300; Post-Office Department, $44,900; Judiciary, $63,200; Mint and Independent Treasury, $80,000; Foreign Intercourse, $100,000; Light-Houses, $150,000; expenses of collecting Revenue, $545,000; Executive mansion, $5,000; miscellaneous, $200,000. Total, $1,468,190.
Military organization of the Confederate States. --Three military bills have passed the Southern Congress. The first authorizes the raising of one hundred thousand volunteers, when deemed necessary by the President.--The second provides for the provisional army of the Confederate States, and is formed from the regular and vConfederate States, and is formed from the regular and volunteer forces of the different States, to serve for terms of enlistments, with same officers, except those above the rank of Colonel. The commissions of the officers expire with the enlistment of the men. The third organization is the regular army of the Confederate States, and is a permanent establishment. m the regular and volunteer forces of the different States, to serve for terms of enlistments, with same officers, except those above the rank of Colonel. The commissions of the officers expire with the enlistment of the men. The third organization is the regular army of the Confederate States, and is a permanent establishment.
laveholding States." Both reports were ordered to be printed, and were made the special order for the third Monday in December. The resolution providing for the election by the Convention of seven delegates to the Border State Convention was then passed, and the Convention adjourned. St. Louis,March 22.--In the Convention this morning, a committee of one from each Congressional district was elected to call a Convention together, previous to the third Monday in December, if the public exigencies require it. The following gentlemen were elected delegates to the Border States Convention:--Hamilton R. Gamble, John B. Henderson, Wm. A. Hall, James H. Moss, Wm. Douglas, Littlebury Hendricks, and Wm. G. Pomeroy. A resolution was adopted, instructing the President of the Convention to transmit a certified copy of the proceedings of the Convention to the President of the United States, and the Governors of each State. Adjourned till the third Monday in December.
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