Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 28, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Washington or search for Washington in all documents.

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Old pioneer gone. --Dr. Van Hamn, an old citizen of Ohio, died on Friday last, at Zanesville, where he had resided since the year1806. He was born in Pennsylvania, in 1776; was educated in Philadelphia, and emigrated to Ohio about the time it became one of the States of the Union. While at Philadelphia pursuing his studies, he became acquainted with General Washington and Thomas Jefferson — Philadelphia being at that time the seat of the United States Government, of which the former was President and the latter Secretary of State. Mr. Jefferson's ideas of Government were so firmly impressed upon his mind, that he had both his sons educated at the University of Virginia, to insure them being instructed in the true political faith. His first vote was cast for Mr. Jefferson for President. Dr. Van Hamn was Surgeon under General Harrison, and served through the whole campaign of the War of1812, with Great Britain. General Jackson appointed him Minister to Chili, and he held under t
e distinction of being called "the Father of his Country? " A Virginian. Who moved, in the Continental Congress, that the Colonies were and of right ought to be sovereign and independent States? A Virginian. Who gave to America her Magna Charta, her petition of right, and her noble Declaration of Independence? A Virginian. Thus might we go on, illustrating the glory of Virginia's past history, but we have said enough. Every school boy knows the story of her struggles and her triumph; her Washington, her Henry, her Jefferson, and her Madison, are enshrined in the hearts of grateful millions. We must now turn from Virginia past to Virginia present and future — from what she once was to what she now is, and to what she may be. With warmth, with gratitude, and with pride, we remember the past — with feelings, more of sorrow than of anger, we consider the present — with the saddest and gloomiest forebodings, we lift the curtain of the future. As in 1775-'76 Virginia was in the m<
The Virginia mails. --A dispatch from Washington to a Republican paper North speaking of the opposition of the people of Virginia to the appointment of Abolition mail agents, says: The people along the routes threaten tar and feathers to the unlucky agents if they attempt to do their duty, and one has already resigned and the other is expected to throw up his commission. Several Virginia Republicans have presented themselves for the vacancies, and will serve at all hazards. If the ey attempt to do their duty, and one has already resigned and the other is expected to throw up his commission. Several Virginia Republicans have presented themselves for the vacancies, and will serve at all hazards. If the people interrupt them the mails are likely to be cut off. The Department has determined to postpone the appointment of Postmasters and Mail Agents throughout the State until after the State election, in May next. A clean sweep will then be made. dispatch from Washington"
be otherwise than injurious to those who make it. Old Rip Van Winkle is slow, it is true, but he has a good substratum when it is reached. The old Ship of State has been broken in twain. As to one of her parts, we like not her helmsman; we like not, for the most part, her crew; we like not her destination.--We invite you into a new ship. Its timbers are sound — its crew harmonious. We are seeking the same port. A new and grand development awaits us — with new energy, diffused into every department of life, action and thought; vast resources, physical, intellectual, moral, we have ingloriously left unprofitable. We have been fond of our ease — content with foreign supplies. A separate existence will stimulate our whole energy. Come with us, and let us share our destiny. Above all, we cannot spare the mother of Washington, nor the State which sent the first declaration of freedom to the world from the old hills of Mecklenburg. Washington, Ga.,March 23, 18