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at flashed over the telegraphic wires, looking to the preservation of peace, seemed to disappoint the precipitators. At that time, the gentlemen who are now for waiting were the most urgent for precipitate action. The gentleman from Bedford, (Mr. Goode,) who is now for waiting, was then among the most ardent advocates of haste. Mr. Goode desired to remind the gentleman that the 4th of March had come and gone. Mr. Tredway said he regretted that he had not also said that it had provedMr. Goode desired to remind the gentleman that the 4th of March had come and gone. Mr. Tredway said he regretted that he had not also said that it had proved him to be a very bad prophet. He then went on to demonstrate that the moderation of Virginia thus far had saved the country from the horrors of civil war; and though he had been pointed at as a submissionist, he would ever be proud that he was one of those who had stood by this glorious old Commonwealth in her efforts as a peace-maker. He acknowledged the fact that the Union was broken up; seven States had gone and established a government Mr. de facto, and it ought to be recognized. Had th
. Tredway resumed his remarks, proceeding first to correct any misapprehension which might have existed in reference to his reply to the gentleman from Bedford, (Mr. Goode,) this morning. The position which he occupied was not that "nobody had been hurt" by the success of the Black Republican party, but that the prophesied evils hand untenable, he submitted a motion that the Committee rise. The motion was agreed to, and the Committee rose and reported progress. In Convention. Mr. Goode, of Bedford, said that in obedience to the request of a portion of his constituents, he would present the proceedings of two public meetings in his county. One,ressed. The resolutions (which favor immediate secession and protest against any change in the system of taxation at this time, &c.) were, at the request of Mr. Goode, laid on the table. Mr. Harvie, of Amelia, presented a series of resolutions adopted by a large meeting of the citizens of that county — the largest he ever