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Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.Affairs in Norfolk and Portsmouth. Norfolk, Va., April 11, 1861. Great excitement prevailed here yesterday, out of the fact that a number of dispatches had been received stating that seven war steamers were off Charleston harbor, and of the official information to Gov. Pickens of the intended reinforcement of "Fort Sumter." --Many of our Union men, I have reason to believe, were converted then to the ranks of the Secessionists. The secession feeling, I have some ground of believing, is gaining strong hold upon our citizens; and now, since the war rumors that have reached us, many are for immediate secession. A petition to this effect was lately sent to our representative in the Convention, signed by a number of our most prominent citizens. Our city press teem with rumors of this kind, and are anxiously perused by our people. A great deal of excitement is expressed to hear the latest news from Charleston, and our papers will
The Daily Dispatch: April 13, 1861., [Electronic resource], Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch. (search)
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch. Things in Petersburg. Petersburg, April 11, 1861. After a day of the most intense excitement, arising from rumored dispatches said to have been received by a distinguished citizen of Richmond, a damper, in the form of a telegram direct from Charleston to a prominent citizen of this city, stating that there was no excitement, and no anticipation of an immediate fight, effectually cooled down the heated passions of our citizens to a very low temperature. Whatever may be the feeling towards the fleet sent South by Lincoln, elsewhere, there exists but one sentiment with regard to it here, and that is, that it may be sunk to the bottom of the ocean, and not a vestige of it remain to tell of its former existence. There is an intense desire to terminate the suspense now existing throughout the land, and which has well night become intolerable. War, with all its entailments — blood, tears and gloom, would be a relief to the public
special for twelve o'clock. G. T. Beauregard. [no. 6.]Gen. Beauregard to the Secretary of War. Charleston April 11, 1861. To L. P. Walker: --Demand sent at two o'clock. Allowed till 6 o'clock to answer. G. T. Beauregard. [no. 7.]the Secretary of War to Gen. Beauregard. Montgomery April 11, 1861. Gen. Beauregard, Charleston:--Telegraph reply of Anderson. L. P. Walker. [no. 8.]Gen. Beauregard to the Secretary of War. Charleston April 11, 1861. To L. P.April 11, 1861. To L. P. Walker: --Major Anderson replied:"I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication demanding the evacuation of this fort, and to say in reply thereto that it is a demand with which I regret that my sense of honor and of my obls." Answer. Major Anderson" G. T. Beauregard. [no. 9.]the Secretary of War to Gen. Beauregard. Montgomery April 11, 1861. To Gen. Beauregard, Charleston: --We do not desire needlessly to bombard Fort Sumter. If Major Anderson will