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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 74 4 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 60 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 16 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 12 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 10 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 6 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 5 1 Browse Search
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 13, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Brunswick, Me. (Maine, United States) or search for Brunswick, Me. (Maine, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 1 document section:

first assembled — new issues were presented — and his object was now to get the voice of Virginia; he was willing to trust the people upon the present basis of representation. The amendment was lost — yeas 61, nays 66. Mr. Mallory, of Brunswick, moved to amend Mr. Scott's amendment, by striking out "Arkansas." He indicated that he made the motion to get an opportunity of lecturing the Committee. He was tired of this eternal discussion, which he thought was nothing but child's play. made on the report. He appealed to the body, as an old man — the oldest here except the gentleman from Charles City, (Mr. Tyler)--to cease speaking, and let us vote and go home. Mr. Rives, of Prince George, agreed with the gentleman from Brunswick. They were quarreling here over questions of no practical importance. He alluded with characteristic severity to the inconsistency of the secessionists in voting for a principle of representation which was utterly denied to the people of the