Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 13, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Augusta (Georgia, United States) or search for Augusta (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

he popular voice. He had now inserted the principle, and he wanted to see if they would stand up to it. Mr. Tredway, of Pittsylvania, opposed both the amendment of the gentleman from Fauquier and the amendment offered by the gentleman from Augusta. He opposed them because of the delay involved. He went on to show that his people were suffering under the present state of things, and protracted delay would prostrate their interests completely. Mr. Baldwin thought that the experience ed to further amend Mr. Scott's amendment by striking out "by the time appointed for the re-assembling of this body, and inserting in lieu thereof the words "the 1st of October next." In urging his amendment, Mr. Harvie defied the gentleman from Augusta to go before the people upon the issue whether Virginia should withdraw from the Federal Government, or upon the question whether the Union men or the secessionists had best represented the people here. He charged that the object was, by the ma
f his argument — he would be charged with the time. Mr. Wise said, then he would them, but would have them read by the ry.--Gentlemen were still contending lay, while the war was going on. He would challenge the gentlemen from Fauquier and Augusta to resign their seats with him, to-day, and go home. The remainder of Mr. W.'s remarks were directed to the positions assumed by those gentlemen. Mr. Wise's amendment was voted down. Mr. Early, of Franklin, moved to amend Mr. Scott's Mecklenburg, moved to amend Mr. Scott's amendment by striking out the words "Confederated States" and inserting "Southern States." He said he offered this amendment merely to get an opportunity to reply to the shots thrown by the gentleman from Augusta, (Mr. Baldwin,) into the secession ranks. He thought if he had remembered the couplet of Burns, "O wad some pow'r the giftie give us, To see oursel's as others see us," the charge of inconsistency would never have come from him. Mr. G