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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 8 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 19, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Weir or search for Weir in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

An Exciting scene. --The agony is over.--War has commenced. We shall never forget the scene presented yesterday, when the fact first became known, by the raising of the flag at the at the telegraph office, that the bombardment of Fort Sumter had actually commenced. The people seemed wild with excitement, and congregated around the telegraph office in vast numbers for the purpose of ascertaining the news. Presently, the venerable Dr. Weir, of this city, appeared in the balcony, and proposed three cheers for General Beauregard, which was responded to most enthusiastically. After this occurrence — after having gleaned all the intelligence from each other that was profitable at that locality, the vast crowd then commenced pouring in the direction of the Government buildings, where the Confederate colors had also been thrown to the breeze, and a squad of the "Blues" were firing a salute--seven guns being for the Confederate States, and the remaining one in honor of that gallant sp