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The Daily Dispatch: April 29, 1861., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 25, 1862., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 18, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 28, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 8 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 7 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 5, 1864., [Electronic resource] 7 1 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 6 0 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 29, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Charles Smith or search for Charles Smith in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

lly enable our sister city to give another welcome to the New York Seventh Regiment, or to any other friends who may challenge their respects. The shot, shell and other ammunition which were thrown into the river by the vandal hordes before their flight, are also being raised in large quantities. And it is gratifying to learn that — contrary to our first impressions and belief — in their haste and fright they actually left several hundred guns in a remote part of the Yard unsplit. Smith. The Smyth Blues (a splendid company, now in Richmond,) received their call "to arms" with great joy; and were ready to start early the next morning. The Marion Visitor says: Some time before the special train was due at our depot they took up their line of march for that place, attended by a large concourse of our citizens, eager to testify their love and admiration for that gallant little band, who had bravely taken their lives in their hands and were willing to spend and be spe
he completion of uniforms to be mustered into service; and when they shall have been mustered in, the Regiment will then be composed of ten companies, numbering in the aggregate about 670 men. We have also in barracks four large, efficient, and I may add thoroughly well drilled companies of infantry from Georgia, who arrived here a few nights back, officered by the first men of the State, and the soldiers are the very flower of the South. They are the Macon Volunteers, commanded by Captain Smith, a very eminent lawyer of Macon, who has laid aside a practice of $8,000 or $10,000 to respond to the call of his country; Floyd Rifles, Capt. Thomas Hardaman, member of the last Congress of the United States; City Light Guards, of Columbus, Captain P. H. Colquitt, son of the Ex-Senator, and a gentleman of high legal attainments; and the Spalding Greys, of Spalding county, Captain L. T. Doyal, a jurist of considerable note. By the way, it seems the papers regard all this section of
Forgery. --Charles Smith, a prisoner in the city Jail, who was sent on for examination in several cases of forgery, was before the Mayor on Saturday, to answer three new charges — forging the name of P. Theo. Moore & Co. to checks in three instances. The cases were continued. A complaint was entered against Smith, for forgiw charges — forging the name of P. Theo. Moore & Co. to checks in three instances. The cases were continued. A complaint was entered against Smith, for forging the name of James R. Crenshaw to a check for $37.50. The case was continued. Smith seems an ingenious youth in the forging business. He will doubtless have his reward. w charges — forging the name of P. Theo. Moore & Co. to checks in three instances. The cases were continued. A complaint was entered against Smith, for forging the name of James R. Crenshaw to a check for $37.50. The case was continued. Smith seems an ingenious youth in the forging business. He will doubtless have his rew