hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 488 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 174 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 128 0 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 104 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 88 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 80 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 72 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 68 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 64 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 60 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 29, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Indiana (Indiana, United States) or search for Indiana (Indiana, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

, have forsaken their books, to sharpen anew the dirks and claymores of their revolutionary sires in the defence of their homes, their wives, God and their native country. We have intelligence that five companies, raised in Southern Illinois, are en route for the Southern Confederation, and that 10 Irish regiments from the North have tendered their services to this Government. A letter was shown me by a Government officer on yesterday, from a man of influence in the States of Illinois and Indiana, declaring that any number of men could be enlisted for the Southern Army in those States and in portions of Ohio. A communication appeared in the Mail newspaper of to-day, signed "Caution," alluding to the location in this city of agents or correspondents of abolition journals, pointing directly to the immortal George N. Saunders, the "Secession correspondent of the New York Tribune," who, it seems, enjoys quite an intimacy with some of the officers of the Government here, who believe
April 24. --The extra session of the Legislature convenes to-day. The old officers resigned, and new officers were elected without regard to party lines. After the organization the Star- Spangled Banner, Red, White and Blue, and the Union forever, were sung. The House then adjourned, and marched, headed by a band, to Camp Morton, to listen to an address to the soldiers by the Hon. S. A. Douglas. A sufficient number of companies have been offered to form ten additional regiments. Indiana can send to the field within one month 50,000 volunteers. The Assembly will place the State upon a war footing at present, and establish a reserve guard of 10,000 men. New York, April 24. --The steamer Daylight is to sail with 250 recruits and volunteers. The steamer Montgomery sailed this morning with the artillery of the eighth regiment. The steamer Huntsville is being fitted into a gunboat. The Monticello has taken ten-inch swivels on board, and is expected to sail thi
e the telegraph office, and detail a company to guard the bridge over Big Muddy, which is about eighty miles above Cairo, on the Illinois Central Road. Were Lincoln not known a liar, the assemblage of troops at Cairo might be taken as made with a view of simply protecting, not obstructing, the free navigation of the Mississippi; but when we tell our readers that the very passengers who informed us of the arrival of the troops also state that on all the lines coming through Illinois and Indiana to the Ohio river provisions, consigned to Southern buyers, who have actually paid for them, are stopped and taken from the train; when we recollect the action of Cincinnati, and the remarks of the Republican press, there can be no doubt that these troops are stationed at Cairo to prevent the passing south ward of either arms, ammunition or provisions. The stealing of property paid for, and returning it to the seller who keeps the money and takes back his goods, is beyond comparison th