Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 29, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Fort Pickens (Florida, United States) or search for Fort Pickens (Florida, United States) in all documents.

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dence of the Dispatch.] Montgomery, Ala., April 23, 1861. Capt. J. R. Hamilton, the able and ingenious projector of the Floating Battery, which poured into Sumter such a destructive fire, and passed unscathed through the terrible ordeal to which the heroic Anderson subjected it, has been engaged all the morning in exhibiting a model of it to the Secretary of War, who, after the delineation, will authorize the immediate construction of a similar one to be used in the bombardment of Fort Pickens. The United States commander at that place has recently declared to Gen. Bragg that he should act entirely on the defensive, consequently there will be no fighting for two weeks or more. Capt. Hamilton will have ample time to construct his ball and bombproof battery, and Gen. Bragg a sufficient delay to charge with the most crushing thunder the war cloud that now overhangs the doomed fortress. The moment the preparations are completed the attack will commence, and it must and will
,000 a year each as long as the war shall last. Fifteen hundred Tennessean are expected here to-day to join the Confederate army. A meeting of five hundred of the ladies of New Orleans was held at the St. Charles Hotel for the purpose of making arrangements for the holding of a fair to raise money for clothing the Louisiana volunteers. The people here are greatly excited; the most unbounded enthusiasm prevails throughout the city. No confidence is placed in the dispatches which we receive from the North. Eight vessels of war are reported off Pensacola, and it is supposed that the Federal Government have succeeded in reinforcing Fort Pickens. The reports received here respecting a complete reaction in the city of New York against the South are not believed. Ship news. New York, April 25. --Arrived, barks Clara Haxall and Lancastrian, from Rio Janeiro; Maria Murton, from Charleston; Warren, from New Orleans; G. W. Horton, from Apalachicola.
Fort Pickens. --A Pensacola correspondent of the Savannah Republican writes, April 21, as follows: As to when the fight will come off, no one here, of course, knows. Each party seems disposed to hold off for the present, to make more thorough preparation. Now that Pickens has been reinforced, I can see nothing to be gained by precipitate action, and everything to lose. We should be thoroughly prepared. I give it as my candid opinion that the Confederate States will never possess As to when the fight will come off, no one here, of course, knows. Each party seems disposed to hold off for the present, to make more thorough preparation. Now that Pickens has been reinforced, I can see nothing to be gained by precipitate action, and everything to lose. We should be thoroughly prepared. I give it as my candid opinion that the Confederate States will never possess Fort Pickens. When the United States forces find the place untenable, it will be dismantled and blown up.