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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,078 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 442 0 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 430 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 324 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 306 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 284 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 254 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 150 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 2, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Maryland (Maryland, United States) or search for Maryland (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

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call which summons them to the defence of the Capital: They deprecate the necessity which brought them upon the soil of Maryland. As individuals and true gentlemen they appreciate, and I might almost say sympathize with, their Southern brothers. Ted in the 4th artillery, United States Army, for a number of years. On Saturday evening a meeting of the natives of Maryland residing in Philadelphia was held at the American Hotel, for the purpose of devising some means for the support of the eady to co-operate with your Excellency in suppressing most promptly and effectively any insurrection against the laws of Maryland. I beg, therefore, that you announce publicly that any portion of the forces under my command is at your Excellencyost sorry appearance, many half shod, half dressed and decidedly unclean. All our Northern friends on the march through Maryland complain that they find the climate very hot.. If this be the case thus early in the season, what will be the effect in
he doings of the Southern people, he furnished a shining example of how hear to the brassy of the field a man may assimilate himself and still live. Perhaps the powers above that think him too mean to die. We have alluded to the forced exodus from the so-called seat of the "General Government" of may of its most valuable citizens. Among the number who have recently been compelled to leave that city of abominations, is Captain Schwazmann, a true Southern States-Rights man, a native of Maryland, who will be remembered by our citizens as having been once in Richmond with the German Yagers, of which he was the founder, and who, because his successor refused to take Lincoln's test oath, was refused his commission; in consequence of which the company has been ignored as part of the District soldiery. Every species of annoyance was submitted to by this gentleman, till finally he has been compelled to leave his business and bring his family to this city. He is now stopping at the Powh
[special Dispatch to the Richmond Dispatch.]more Federal Outrages. Alexandria May 1. --The proclamation of President Lincoln, declaring martial law, was promulgated to-day, It divides Maryland into four military districts, thus absorbing her sovereignty; and the fifth military district embraces the District of Columbia, including Alexandria! Under this order, inoffensive citizens were driven from their families and expelled from the city, at the point of the bayonet. H.
and which could be conveniently spared. The Northern Government is now concentrating a large force in the District of Columbia, ostensibly to protect the seat of Government, but such a force cannot be allowed to remain within the limits of Maryland and on the borders of Virginia, without seriously endangering the liberties of the people of those States. If they be conquered and overrun, North Carolina will become the next prey to the invaders. Policy then, as well as sympathy and feeling of brotherhood, engendered by a common interest, requires us to exert our energies in the defence of Maryland and Virginia. Every battle fought there will be a battle fought in behalf of North Carolina, and there our troops should be speedily sent. There can be no doubt that the people of our State are now fully united as to the policy to be pursued with reference to the future Northern Government. It is a settled conviction of the public mind that the time has arrived when we must separ
Resigned. --Major Lloyd J. Beall, late of the United States Army, has resigned his commission, and has gone to Montgomery to offer his services to the Confederate States. He is a native of Maryland. His father served as a captain in Howard's Veteran Brigade, in 1775.
Annapolis correspondent of the Baltimore press as follows: "If you are a lover of peace, and at the same time a friend of the South, determined but wise, you will, I hope, give some consideration to the facts and deductions that I here present you." "The New York Seventh Regiment is famed over the country — you know what for. They are here now in obedience to a call which summons them to the defence of the Capital: They deprecate the necessity which brought them upon the soil of Maryland. As individuals and true gentlemen they appreciate, and I might almost say sympathize with, their Southern brothers. They have created upon the minds of all who see them an unmistakably favorable impression. Go among them and see if this is not true of this regiment of gentlemen. Now, remember that many of the officers and soldiers of this corps are intimately connected with members of the next Congress, and will no doubt, exercise some influence upon that body." "In view of all t
Affairs in Philadelphia. Deputy Marshal Jenkins on Friday seized 250 barrels of flour, at the Baltimore depot intended for Baltimore; and on Saturday two kegs of powder and six revolvers were found among the effects of a citizen of Cecil county, Md., which were overhauled at the Broad and Prime street depot. Captain Albert L. Magilton, late of the United States Army, has accepted the command of a volunteer regiment of Philadelphia, which is nearly full and ready for service. Captain Magilton served in the 4th artillery, United States Army, for a number of years. On Saturday evening a meeting of the natives of Maryland residing in Philadelphia was held at the American Hotel, for the purpose of devising some means for the support of the exiles from Baltimore. On the same evening speeches were made by the "exiles" from Baltimore at the Continental Hotel, J. B. Shoemaker, Edward Rawlings and T. Joseph Rogers.
Temper and strength of the invaders. We have given lately an article from the New York Tribune, proclaiming that the lands of Virginia and Maryland must be divided among the invaders. We copy the following diabolical programme from the New York Courier and Enquirer: "The game is now fairly opened; and it must be played out with a bold and unflinching hand. And instead of seventy-five thousand volunteers, the Government must call forth at least two hundred thousand. With these, occupy such places as are deemed important, and then establish a cordon of posts from Washington to the Mississippi, composed of from five to thirty thousand men each, with power to concentrate a large and overwhelming force at any point where circumstances may render it necessary. Let this cordon of posts be along the borders of the secession States, and let no man pass North or South except with a military pass. The coast is already blockaded; and that blockade, to be respected by European Power
ccurs the following: I have understood within the last hour that some apprehensions were entertained of an insurrection of the negro population of this neighborhood. I am anxious to convince all classes of persons that the forces under my command are not here in any way to interfere with or countenance any interference with the laws of the State. I am, therefore, ready to co-operate with your Excellency in suppressing most promptly and effectively any insurrection against the laws of Maryland. I beg, therefore, that you announce publicly that any portion of the forces under my command is at your Excellency's disposal, to act immediately for the preservation and quietness of the peace of this community. Gov. Hicks replied: I thank you most sincerely for the tender of your men; but I had, before the receipt of your letter, directed the sheriff of the county to act in the matter, and am confident that the citizens of the county are fully able to suppress any insurrec
n was made, and about 500 of the entire number (991,) took the oath for thirty days. The remainder refused even to sign the oath, unless it was again modified by inserting the condition that they "were not to bear arms against either Virginia or Maryland." To this the Government, it is said, gave their consent, and all but about fifty accepted the oath as modified. Many of them, however, have refused to take any oath, saying that they have been deceived, and will never engage in an unholy war a1,) took the oath for thirty days. The remainder refused even to sign the oath, unless it was again modified by inserting the condition that they "were not to bear arms against either Virginia or Maryland." To this the Government, it is said, gave their consent, and all but about fifty accepted the oath as modified. Many of them, however, have refused to take any oath, saying that they have been deceived, and will never engage in an unholy war against Maryland, and particularly Baltimoreans.
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