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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
The Daily Dispatch: September 14, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 2, 1861., [Electronic resource] 7 1 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 5 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 6, 1861., [Electronic resource] 7 5 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 6 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 6 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 6 6 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 8, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 23, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 6, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Stringham or search for Stringham in all documents.

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The fleet. A Washington Republican paper learns that a dozen vessels of Commodore Stringham's fleet will very shortly put to sea. This fleet, it adds, " is to consist of at least fifty war vessels of various descriptions, accompanied by sufficient steam transport for the accommodation of a land force at least twenty thousand strong." This is the most approved style of Republican gassing. There are but seventy-five " war vessels " of all descriptions in the old U.S. Navy, and at least half of those are worthless hulks. Revenue cutters and musket steamers armed with a gun or two, with a few " war vessels, " probably make up the fleet of fifty, which will have to behave much better than the great fleet sent to Fort Sumter, before anybody will be hurt or even scared.