Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 27, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for James Edwards or search for James Edwards in all documents.

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A patriotic offer. --We received a call this morning from a gallant Mississipian, Captain James Edwards, of the Bay of St. Louis, Hancock county, who comes to offer the service of himself and the use of his mill for the defence of the coast. He proposes that the Government shall take charge of the mill — saw lumber to build gun-boats or for other purposes, and says all that he asks is a soldier's rations during the war. Furthermore, if the timber cannot be obtained, he has twelve hundreds or for other purposes, and says all that he asks is a soldier's rations during the war. Furthermore, if the timber cannot be obtained, he has twelve hundred acres of live cak which is at the service of the Government. Captain Edwards came from Mississippi to make the offer, and he is now urging its acceptance by the Navy Department. He is not a wealthy man, all his property being mentioned in these few lines. Such patriotic liberality is certainly worthy of record.--Montgomery Adv., 22d.
Mayor's Court, Saturday. --The cases before his Honor, on Saturday, were more numerous than important in character. Tobias Pearsall, of the Star Saloon, was summoned up for keeping his house open after 10 o'clock on sundry occasions, when the ordinance demanded it should be shut. The case was laid over for another hearing. James McDonald was fined for a similar violation of the ordinance. Case of Anthony, slave of Spotts & Harvey, for threatening to assault James Edwards, was continued till Tuesday. Earnest Noke was committed to jail as a suspicious person. Ira Richardson, suspicious in looks and hailing from Washington, D. C., here without ostensible business, was sent to jail.--So was Byron W. Bernard, alias Camp, a kind of Confidence Jeremy Diddler, whose case has heretofore been mentioned. Virginia Lee, free negro, was committed on failing to give security for her good behavior. She had been disturbing the peace of the neighborhood in which she lived. John Curren wa