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The Daily Dispatch: may 30, 1861., [Electronic resource] 34 22 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 27, 1861., [Electronic resource] 28 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 22 14 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 12 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 31, 1861., [Electronic resource] 12 2 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 9 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 4, 1861., [Electronic resource] 9 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 28, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 27, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Ellsworth or search for Ellsworth in all documents.

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, and immediate preparations were made for the Virginia troops to leave. Ellsworth's Regiment of Fire Zouaves, in two steamers, touched the wharf about that houpassengers, moved away just in time to escape. Regarding the shooting of Ellsworth, by Mr. Jackson, two statements are made.--One is that Ellsworth had taken doEllsworth had taken down the flag and was passing through Mr. Jackson's room with the flag wound around him. Mr. Jackson who was in bed, demanded the cause of the intrusion, and EllsworthEllsworth cursed him; whereupon Jackson shot him down with a double-barrel gun. The Zouaves then rushed in and murdered Mr. Jackson. Another account states that Jackson shot Ellsworth down with a pistol, as he entered the house. Our informants, however, are satisfied that Ellsworth was killed. The railroad track in the vicinity of Ellsworth was killed. The railroad track in the vicinity of Alexandria is said to have been torn up by the New York Zouaves. The Railroad Bridge has been burnt by the Virginians. All who could leave Alexandria by the
Still later. The Killing of Ellsworth by Jackson — Heroism of Virginia Women. A gentleman who arrived in Richmond last evening, reports as follows: Ellsworth ascended to the roof of the Marshall House, and secured the flag. Coming dEllsworth ascended to the roof of the Marshall House, and secured the flag. Coming down with the flag wrapped around him, he met Mr. Jackson, when Ellsworth remarked, "Here, I have got a prize." Jackson replied "Yes, and here is another prize." --at the same time levelling his double barrel shot-gun, and shooting Ellsworth dead on Ellsworth remarked, "Here, I have got a prize." Jackson replied "Yes, and here is another prize." --at the same time levelling his double barrel shot-gun, and shooting Ellsworth dead on the spot. Jackson was speedily murdered by the Zouaves. The shot that killed him pierced his brain. Mrs. Jackson and her sister, as we are informed, took possession of the flag, drew revolvers, and defied the Zouaves, who endeavored to taEllsworth dead on the spot. Jackson was speedily murdered by the Zouaves. The shot that killed him pierced his brain. Mrs. Jackson and her sister, as we are informed, took possession of the flag, drew revolvers, and defied the Zouaves, who endeavored to take it from them. The ladies tore the flag into shreds, determined that it should not pass into the hands of Lincoln's ruffians. Connected with this affair, we may publish the following copy of a card, which Mr. Jackson had circulated to advert
from Washington.the great military advance.war! war!! war!!!the Killing of Col. Ellsworth.Arlington Heights occupied. Rejection by England of the United States A2d, 12th, 7th and 21st Regiments, the New Jersey and Michigan brigades, and Col. Ellsworth's Fire Zouaves, were, so far as is at present ascertained, constituted the ents to proceed and occupy Alexandria, and it is stated, at this time, that Col. Ellsworth's Zouaves have crossed over in boats, while it is equally certain that prepnded by an event which has cast the deepest gloom over this community. Col. Ellsworth, who had hauled down the secession flag from the Marshall House, was soon afused; but there is no doubt of the fact that a man named Jackson, who shot Col. Ellsworth, was instantly put to death; some say by both bullets and the bayonet. were conducted with the best possible order. The news of the death of Col. Ellsworth was not generally known throughout Washington until ten o'clock this mornin
The Daily Dispatch: may 27, 1861., [Electronic resource], Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch. affairs in Old Louisa. (search)
gular trips to Washington. The telegraph was open to Washington. Col. Wilcox, of Michigan, was in command of the Abolition forces. A proclamation had been issued ordering all the liquor stores and bar-rooms to be closed and citizens to be in doors by 9 o'clock P. M. Evidences of bad discipline had been manifested. Several houses had been broken into and robbed. A general order, issued last night by Gen. Scott, stopping all entrance into or exit from the city, caused great inconvenience. The news of Ellsworth's death had created great excitement throughout the entire North. A collision occurred Saturday, on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. Three men were killed and six dangerously wounded — among the killed is one Virginian and one South Carolinian. A large Union vote was polled in Wheeling and the North Western counties. The Washington Star of yesterday reports an engagement at Harper's Ferry. The Federal troops were repulsed with great loss.