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Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.Gen. Scott and the Lincoln Administration. Richmond, Va. May 24, 1861. A distinguished gentleman whose name is known and respected in all sections of this country, and whose veracity has never been questioned, recently passed through this city, and while here he made known a very i. Seward replied, assuring the old General that Mr. Lincoln would coerce, even though it might lead to securing another Commander-in-Chief of the U. S. forces. General Scott finally yielded to Black Republican pressure, though the Administration doubt as to his being heart and soul with them, and hence are in favor of substituting a younger and more energetic man. I believe the above information is reliable, and therefore place it at your disposal. General Scott has not, and cannot have, that zeal and enthusiasm in destroying his mother, that Gen. Lee and President Davis have in defending her.-- He is led on by the $17,000 per annum; they, by the purest mot
n Demorcat, in noticing the arrival in that place of two companies of volunteers from Scott county, says: "As the companies passed through the streets, three cheers were called for in honor of Scott county. Some member responded, 'it is not Scott county how! We intend to call it Davis county.' And this we learn is the sentiment of the county generally. The people intend to apply to the Legislature to change the name of the county, not desiring that any such disgrace should attach to it om Scott county, says: "As the companies passed through the streets, three cheers were called for in honor of Scott county. Some member responded, 'it is not Scott county how! We intend to call it Davis county.' And this we learn is the sentiment of the county generally. The people intend to apply to the Legislature to change the name of the county, not desiring that any such disgrace should attach to it as being called after the traitor and parricide, Winfield Scott. This is right."
Unparalleled Brutality. The Enquirer states the following facts upon reliable information: "An officer in the Virginia Army, who resigned his commission in the United States Army some time since, and whose family is still in Washington, asked permission the other day to visit that city to attend the barial of a deceased child. General Scott promptly and indignantly refused, declaring that if thousands of children were to be buried, no officer of the Virginia Army could visit Washington without arrest."
The Daily Dispatch: may 27, 1861., [Electronic resource], Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch. affairs in Old Louisa. (search)
leaving as fast possible. The port was open and steamers were making regular trips to Washington. The telegraph was open to Washington. Col. Wilcox, of Michigan, was in command of the Abolition forces. A proclamation had been issued ordering all the liquor stores and bar-rooms to be closed and citizens to be in doors by 9 o'clock P. M. Evidences of bad discipline had been manifested. Several houses had been broken into and robbed. A general order, issued last night by Gen. Scott, stopping all entrance into or exit from the city, caused great inconvenience. The news of Ellsworth's death had created great excitement throughout the entire North. A collision occurred Saturday, on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. Three men were killed and six dangerously wounded — among the killed is one Virginian and one South Carolinian. A large Union vote was polled in Wheeling and the North Western counties. The Washington Star of yesterday reports an engagem