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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,078 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 442 0 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 430 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 324 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 306 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 284 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 254 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 150 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 27, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Maryland (Maryland, United States) or search for Maryland (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

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at soldiers are pouring into Wilmington from all quarters of the South, and that the rebel force is by far more formidable than at first supposed. They anticipate immediate hostilities. Recruiting is said to be going on in various parts of Maryland. A gentleman from Prince George's county, says recruits for the Confederate army are being carried across the Potomac to Alexandria daily. Contraband goods are also being sent to the rebels. So it appears that treason is not crushed out in MaMaryland yet. Another rumor is afloat here, to the effect that Secretary Seward has just received dispatches from England declaring the intention of that Government not to recognize the Code of the Congress of Paris, of 1856, which denounces privateering as piracy, and alleging that this Code was the act of all the great powers of Europe, in Congress assembled, and it is manifestly not in her power as one of the signers of that compact, to accept, at this late day, the tardy acceptance of the
Kentucky. If Old Kentucky permits the occupation of Paducab, or any portion of her territory by Federal troops, she is not the Kentucky of former times. We cannot believe that the attempt to put her in chains, like Maryland, will be successful.
Immportant to Maryland Volunteers. --By an order issued by Francis J. Thomas, Col. commanding the brigade of volunteers from Maryland, arriving in this city, will report themselves, immediately on their arrival, to Major Weston, who will take forthwith the proper steps to complete their organization into companies. Those arriving at other points on the Potomac, will report to the senior officer from Maryland nearest to them, who will carry out the same instructions. It is recommeng in this city, will report themselves, immediately on their arrival, to Major Weston, who will take forthwith the proper steps to complete their organization into companies. Those arriving at other points on the Potomac, will report to the senior officer from Maryland nearest to them, who will carry out the same instructions. It is recommended that, so far as possible, the men furnish their own blankets and clothing. A proper allowance for the cest will hereafter be made for them.