Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 19, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Old Point (North Carolina, United States) or search for Old Point (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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The steamers Adelaide, Capt. Cannon, and Georgiana, Capt. Pierson, arrived on Saturday and yesterday morning, from Old Point Comfort. They bring intelligence that a movement was to have been made on Yorktown on Saturday night by a large body oif there was no opposition by the Confederate forces. There are now one hundred sick and wounded in the hospital at Old Point, and deaths among the wounded frequently occur. A young man named Cady, from Philadelphia, wounded at Great Bethel, diwn in the Adelaide, but he was dead before she saw him. He was an only child. Miss Dix, with three nurses, went to Old Point on the Adelaide, but she returned and has gone to Washington to attend to some wounded in that city. Quite a number of persons have reached Fortress Monroe to see their wounded friends. The U. S. sloop-of-war Vandalia arrived at Old Point on Friday and exchanged salutes with the flag-ship Cumberland. The S. R. Spaulding also arrived from Boston, with a large q
Rumor. A rumor reached this city last evening that the Federalists had evacuated Newport News. The gentleman who makes the statement left Norfolk yesterday, and says that he learned from two sources that steamers were seen conveying troops from Newport News to Old Point. We give the rumor for what it is worth.
Naval engagement — gallant and daring Chase of a Federal Streamer --On Sunday evening, about seven o'clock, while the Confederate steamer Empire was engaged in reconnoitering the enemy's works at Newport News, Captain Parrish discovered the Federal steamer Cataline, some distance off and under head way for Old Point. Chase was immediately given, and when within a few miles of Hampton Creek, the Empire fired two shots, one of which is believed to have taken effect on the Cataline — and but for the proximity of the Cumberland frigate, which promptly opened her battery to stop the chase, the Cataline would in all probability have fallen into our hands. Capt. Parrish and his officers deserve much praise for their daring conduct in this little affair, as do also several of the Richmond Greys, who were on board the Empire as a marine guard. It is hoped that Capt. Parrish may soon be better prepared for offensive operations, by Laving a larger and more effecttive steamer placed