hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 462 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 416 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 286 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 260 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 254 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 242 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 230 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 218 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 166 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 5, 1860., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for New England (United States) or search for New England (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

the North or the South--it blows hot and cold — opposes the right of secession, but advocates anything but coercion, Mr. Boteler's committee of one from, each State, to consider the Message, will be packed by Speaker Pennington, and decided Southern sentiment will have no one to represent it. Its conclusions will be of no value.--The signs apparent are more and more for discussion. New York is alive to the crisis, but the rural districts of the North think it all summery, and refuse to yield an inch. Mr. Cobb's resignation to-morrow will be accompanied by an address opposing the President's views concerning secession. Judge Black, at present Attorney General, will be nominated for the vacancy on the bench of the Supreme Court, caused by the death of Judge Daniel. Some of the New York members count their ally to be free like Hamburg. They want to get rid of New England at any price. The rich bankers here are in great distress. The weather is clear and cold. Zed.
nd demonstrate her anti slavery faith by her works, and give up, for the benefit of her noble ally, France, the carrying and manufacture of slave grown productions. If she is at all tardy in this course of manifest consistency, the South ought, as far as possible, to spur up her benevolent impulses by taking temptation out of her way, and making some other nation our commercial ally. At the same time, it is but just to say that Old England derives most of her anti-slavery ideas from New England, and her notions of Southern character from just such representations as those of the New York Times. We are informed that, not only in England, but in every part of Europe, the most calumnious caricatures of Southern society are current, propagated by anti-slavery American tourists on the continent. A Southern American cannot enter society in any part of the world, without being confronted at the threshold by the effects of these insidious libels, whilst gentlemen from Cuba and Brazil,
th day of November last, whereas, with the exception of a few Yankee Doodle States, composing an infinitesimal portion of the Anglo-Saxon family, their Thanksgiving day is unknown, and turkeys kept for Christmas. But it is a common notion of New England, that it is the hub of the whole of the creation, the axis of the entire universe, and that when it thanks God that it is not as other men, everybody else is doing the same. The great point, however, is that the eating of a turkey by Mr. Lincnd certainly no man can speak disparagingly of roasted turkey and even pumpkin pie, as great helps to gratitude and devotion. But, because a ma President of the United States, is he not to be allowed to perform even those most solemn rites of New England religion with any degree of privacy? We insist that Old Abe be permitted to solace himself in peace with all the consolations, carnal and spiritual, which belong to Thanksgiving day, for he has a rough road before him, and may never have reas