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City of New York. The following sentiment, which was drunk with enthusiastic cheering at the late festival of our ship owners, merchants, and other prominent citizens, on board the new clipper "Virginia Dare," deserves to be reproduced: The City of New York--She shines out amid the general blackness of the Northern horiCity of New York--She shines out amid the general blackness of the Northern horizon with all the effulgence and beauty of the Aurora Borealis. It is only in a spirit of generous rivalry that we seek to extend our direct trade. She deserves and she has our love and respect. As for her immense commerce--" Este perpetue". This sentiment does honor to those who offered and sustained it, as well as to the to be separated from the interior of New York, and the rest of the State would vanish into hopeless obscurity. We trust that the day may never come when the city of New York will succumb to the Puritanic influences which have abolitionized so large a portion of the country. As long as she is national in spirit she will be nation
ntracts, excites no comment. Disunion and the empty Treasury absorb everything else. Gentlemen from the North tell me that the rural distract are beginning to feel the stress of the crisis, and that we may expect very soon to see the Tribune and the Black Republican politicians come down, as the N. Y. Times has already done. I see the N. Y. Express and the Tribune are giving each other the Yankee, the word Yankee beginning to smell not sweetly in the nostrils of the would-be free city of New York. The "States" newspaper changes hands next Monday. Maj. Heiss retires, and Messrs. Harris and Savage become proprietors. Maj. H. has had little or nothing to do with the paper for many months, being absent as bearer of dispatches to Costa Rica. Lord Lyons, the British Minister, has taken umbrage at certain passages in Secretary Floyd's late letter, which show up the hypocrisy and insincerity of the English government and people in regard to the institution of slavery. He de
The Daily Dispatch: December 10, 1860., [Electronic resource], The Burning of the Kentucky Lunatic Asylum. (search)
ntracts, excites no comment. Disunion and the empty Treasury absorb everything else. Gentlemen from the North tell me that the rural distract are beginning to feel the stress of the crisis, and that we may expect very soon to see the Tribune and the Black Republican politicians come down, as the N. Y. Times has already done. I see the N. Y. Express and the Tribune are giving each other the Yankee, the word Yankee beginning to smell not sweetly in the nostrils of the would-be free city of New York. The "States" newspaper changes hands next Monday. Maj. Heiss retires, and Messrs. Harris and Savage become proprietors. Maj. H. has had little or nothing to do with the paper for many months, being absent as bearer of dispatches to Costa Rica. Lord Lyons, the British Minister, has taken umbrage at certain passages in Secretary Floyd's late letter, which show up the hypocrisy and insincerity of the English government and people in regard to the institution of slavery. He de