hide Matching Documents

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 24, 1860., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for James Buchanan or search for James Buchanan in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

portant resignation. Commodore Kearney, the Second Officer on the active list of the Navy, has resigned his position in the following letter to the President: Perth Amboy, N. J.,Dec. 21, 1860. Sir: It is with deep regret that I find myself so situated professionally, as to request to be placed upon the Reserved List of the Navy, or otherwise to tender my resignation of the commission I hold as Captain. I am, respectfully, sir, your obed't serv't, Lawrence Kearney. Hon. James Buchanan, President of the U. States. It is understood that Commodore Kearney, maintaining relations of extreme intimacy with Southern people, takes this step to avoid the possibility of being called upon to serve against his friends. Rhode Island. Gov. Sprague, of Rhode Island, in answer to a letter inquiring into the truth of a statement made in the New York Herald, that he would refuse to recommend the repeal of the Personal Liberty bill of that State, has made the following expl
merican.] It is evident that this action is intended to cover two points — the one great point being the consummation of some act declaratory of secession, and the other being an effort to leave all the practical relations of the people to the Union in postal and commercial affairs just as they are until "Commissioners" can negotiate. This preliminary ordinance is, therefore, more an appearance than a reality. Under it no officer of the General Government is expected to resign, and Mr. Buchanan's administration is confidently looked to, to aid in smoothing the way for an international arrangement. There is yet, therefore, no "overt act," or any construction of law likely to be made in the case, and there will be none until some of the officers fail to account to the Government, or to obey the orders of the Departments. The passage of a preliminary declaration of this sort is an ingenious and, we were about to say, creditable act — certainly one testifying to a mixture of
tist. He went from Pennsylvania in 1830 with John Randolph, as his Secretary of Legation at St. Petersburg, where he afterward acted in the same capacity with Mr. Buchanan, who has ever since been his friend. In 1838, Mr. Clay was transferred to Vienna, where he was Secretary of Legation until 1845, when he was restored to his p transferred to Vienna, where he was Secretary of Legation until 1845, when he was restored to his position at St. Petersburg by Mr. Buchanan, then Secretary of State. In 1847, Mr. Buchanan obtained from President Polk the appointment of Charge d'affaires to Peru for Mr. Clay, and in 1853 he was made a Minister Plenipotentiary. transferred to Vienna, where he was Secretary of Legation until 1845, when he was restored to his position at St. Petersburg by Mr. Buchanan, then Secretary of State. In 1847, Mr. Buchanan obtained from President Polk the appointment of Charge d'affaires to Peru for Mr. Clay, and in 1853 he was made a Minister Plenipotentiary.