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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 356 34 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 236 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 188 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2 126 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 101 11 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1 76 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 46 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 44 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 26 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 25 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 14, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for San Francisco (California, United States) or search for San Francisco (California, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

The Daily Dispatch: January 14, 1861., [Electronic resource], Perils of the Southern Overland Mail route. (search)
Perils of the Southern Overland Mail route. --Wm. H. Bigbee brings suit in the Fourth District Court of San Francisco. against the Overland Mail Company, complaining that, on the 30th of August last, at Springfield, Mo., he paid $180 for passage to San Francisco, and started; that "a vicious, violent and drunken" driver, one Jacobs, acted as the company's agent, crossing the desert of Arizona; that without any provocation, said agent dragged plaintiff out of the coach, beat bruised, and San Francisco, and started; that "a vicious, violent and drunken" driver, one Jacobs, acted as the company's agent, crossing the desert of Arizona; that without any provocation, said agent dragged plaintiff out of the coach, beat bruised, and wounded him, fired at him a loaded pistol, and drove him into the desert, and then drove on the coach, abandoning him while miles away from any inhabitants. For two days and one night plaintiff wandered, exhausted with the excessive heat, his feet blistered, his tongue blackened and protruding for lack of drink, sick, sore, diseased, and suffering greatly in body and mind. When he reached the station, the stage was gone, and the plaintiff lost the trip — for which wrongs an violation of contr
Arrival of the Overland Pony Express. Fort Kearney, Jan. 11. --The pony express passed here at about one o'clock. San Francisco, Dec. 29--2:40 P. M.--The steamer of the 1st of January will carry away about $1,500,000. The general news for this express is unimportant. Holiday festivities engage the attention of the people of San Francisco since the rainy weather has interrupted business. Pony Express dates were received from Washington to the 14th inst. The serious aspeSan Francisco since the rainy weather has interrupted business. Pony Express dates were received from Washington to the 14th inst. The serious aspect of the secession movement at that time forms the commonest topic of conversation and newspaper discussions. The statement made in the United States Senate by Mr. Latham, that California will remain with the Union of the North and West, no matter what occurs at the South, is generally commended by the newspapers, and is undoubtedly a correct representation of a vast majority of our people on the disunion question. The most ultra Southern men here have an idea that California will go wit