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was nominally inaugurated for the protection of slave property. It has practically destroyed it. The only safety of slave property now lies in the restoration of the Constitution and the Union--It is most fit, therefore, that the property that has caused the rebellion should be specially taxed to pay the expense it has occasioned. And it can well afford to do so in view of the fact that the money now expending by the Nation is the absolute salvation of the property in question. Mr. Secretary Chase very properly presents this whole subject to the consideration of Congress, in his admirable report on the Treasury. He says that "the property of those engaged in insurrection, or in giving aid and comfort to the insurgents, may properly be made to contribute to the expenditure made necessary by their criminal misconduct. As a part of the punishment due to the guilt of involving the Nation in the calamities of civil war, and thereby bringing distress upon so many innocent citizens,
nst it and Greeley for it; and Seward has struck Greeley a very hard blow in the Message. It is noteworthy that Secretary Chase, in his Report to Congress, pays no attention to the huge demand of the Message for men and money. Chase is known tChase is known to have been an original war man, and he palpably snubs the demand of the Message. The silence of the fiscal officer of the Cabinet on so important a recommendation, is significant. It shows that Chase and Seward are not in accord, and that LincolnChase and Seward are not in accord, and that Lincoln is too much of an imbecile to exact for his own recommendations the combined support of his Cabinet. Chase would seem to be on the side of Greeley and the bloody Blairs. War usually unites the contending factions of a party. This war of LincChase would seem to be on the side of Greeley and the bloody Blairs. War usually unites the contending factions of a party. This war of Lincoln seems to have failed of this result. Before the curtains they are all furiously zealous for the war; behind the curtains they have daggers for each other.