Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 13, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Seward or search for Seward in all documents.

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coln. Under the caption of "The Despot's Plea," the Charleston Courier criticises the Message recently issued by the despot at Washington. We copy the concluding portion: The culminating point of the mendacity, impudence, effrontery and mischievous sophistry of this unparalleled Message, is found in that portion relating to the Union and the States. This portion may be best and briefly described as presenting a lie in every line, and nothing would have emboldened even Lincoln, and Seward, and Blair, to venture on such an argument, but a well practiced confidence in the ignorance of Northern readers. Does Abraham Lincoln, Ll. D., know the fact that two at least of the Thirteen States declared separately their independence of the British crown? Does Abraham Lincoln, Ll. D., by the servile fawning of the once honored Columbia College, know that South Carolina declared her independence and established a State Constitution and Government in March, 1776? Does he kno
ressible nature. The contending factions are said to be headed respectively by Seward and Greeley; Seward being sick of the wars and appalled at the results locming Seward being sick of the wars and appalled at the results locming in the perspective; Greeley being full of the nigger and advocating its prosecution, at all cents, unto the liberation of the slaves. Though neither of these phifanaticism with only the cunning needful to effectuate his political aims. Seward, on the contrary, is all cunning without any fanaticism. He cares no more for ns of dollars is to pronounce anathema, maranatha upon it and all its authors. Seward was against it and Greeley for it; and Seward has struck Greeley a very hard blSeward has struck Greeley a very hard blow in the Message. It is noteworthy that Secretary Chase, in his Report to Congress, pays no attention to the huge demand of the Message for men and money. Chasinet on so important a recommendation, is significant. It shows that Chase and Seward are not in accord, and that Lincoln is too much of an imbecile to exact for his