hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 272 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 122 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 100 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 90 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 84 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 82 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 82 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 74 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion 70 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 70 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 13, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) or search for West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Central train yesterday report some interesting proceedings in Patterson's camp at Martinsburg. Some four thousand Pennsylvanians, who enlisted for three months, made up their minds to leave and go home. One account says objection was made, and a fight took place, in which a considerable number of useless lives were lost. We cannot vouch for the accuracy of the last mentioned report, but have no doubt that the three months men determined to leave the service. From Western and North western Virginia the accounts are vague. A dispatch from Cincinnati makes it appear that Capt. O. J. Wise, of the Blues, had captured three companies of Federalists. It is probable that an engagement has taken place in the neighborhood of Laurel Hill, between Gen. Garnett's Confederate forces and McClellan's command, since the Cincinnati telegrams inform us that they were approaching each other at last accounts. We have nothing further in regard to the reported engagement of the 7th. If the Feder
nor Congress will be expected, or indeed permitted, to do anything contrary to the public will. We are disposed to postpone criticism upon a document that appears to be so barbarously trended in its transmission. But we must say that altogether to much attention is bestowed on Virginia's act of Secession in the Message, and the mode in which it was accomplished by the Richmond Convention; and less is said than would have been acceptable, in regard to the movements of the people of Western Virginia and of East Tennessee, for their relief from the tyranny of the Confederate States and the prospect of their success through the aid of Government. Something more than one sentence on "the practice of privateering" by the seceded States, tue occasion perhaps demanded. The country would have liked to know what is the prospect of the ratification of the convention of European governments which declares privateering to be piracy. Some kindly words on the subject of liberal commercial re
he people met us very cordially, and appear to be very glad that we are here. They were all scared nearly to death, and many had left their homes, but are now returning. The enemy arrested the postmaster and placed another in the office; but when the news arrived that we were coming, the fellow ran off and has not been heard from since. "The people generally appear to be willing to abide by the decision of the majority, and from the way the old mountaineers are coming in, I think Western Virginia will yet prove true to the honor of the old Commonwealth. "At the camp of the enemy yesterday, we found two drums, three bags of coffee, six barrels of flour and three barrels of sugar.--This will last us two or three days, as we left all our stores at Charleston. We also found two flags, one of which will be preserved to place in the Blues' armory when we return." The enemy's account of affairs. The following correspondence of the Cincinnati Commercial puts down the loss