Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 13, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) or search for Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) in all documents.

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Cairo. --The following pleasant view of the condition of Lincoln's hirelings at Cairo, is from a Northern paper: No pay, political officers, mixing of Lincolnism and patriotism in fine speech, and picking blackberries for tobacco money, disgusts and demoralizes the privates, while the officers are humiliated by duns from hotels and washerwomen. Washerwomen tell your correspondent they are going to be tuned on the streets because they cannot pay eight or ten dollars, while Colonels oCairo, is from a Northern paper: No pay, political officers, mixing of Lincolnism and patriotism in fine speech, and picking blackberries for tobacco money, disgusts and demoralizes the privates, while the officers are humiliated by duns from hotels and washerwomen. Washerwomen tell your correspondent they are going to be tuned on the streets because they cannot pay eight or ten dollars, while Colonels of regiments are in their debt for twice the amount. No wonder, in such a state of affairs, that out of three regiments only two hundred and thirty voted for the long term, the remaining twenty-seven hundred and seventy taking grounds for disbanding. From all accounts the Cairo soldiers are getting mighty tired of their "fix."
already in the field, and the rest for the most part will have to go afoot. Gen. McRae passed up to Fort Smith a few days since, staying over night here. We are looking for stirring times all along Mason and Dixon's line, and especially at Cairo and in Virginia. I should like to hear of the capture of the great mud hole (Cairo), and also of the bombardment and destruction of that infamous and insolent sink of iniquity, "Sinsennatty," which could easily be done with a few columbiads the capture of the great mud hole (Cairo), and also of the bombardment and destruction of that infamous and insolent sink of iniquity, "Sinsennatty," which could easily be done with a few columbiads and mortars planted opposite on the Kentucky shore. It is to be regretted that the course of Kentucky has been such as to forbid our investing Cincinnati in the manner mentioned. It would be to strike a terrible and trenchant blow where its effect would be terrible and disheartening to the foe.