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The Daily Dispatch: July 18, 1861., [Electronic resource], Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch. (search)
Fifth Regiment N. C. State troops. --The portion of Col. Duncan K. McRae's Fifth Regiment North Carolina Volunteers, which arrived here on Monday, consisted of eight companies, under the command of Lieut. Col. J. P. Jones, the commanding officer being detained at home by sickness. The officers of the Regiment are: Colonel, D. K. McRae; Lieut. Colonel, J. F. Jones; Major, J. C. Barham; Staff Surgeon, Jas. A. McRae; Assistant Surgeons, J. K. Ruffin,--Savage; Commissary, Lt. G. W. Wightman; Quartermaster, J. Kirkland, Jr. The companies are officered as follows: Company A, Ellis Guards, Capt. Sinclair; Company B, Gates Guards, Capt. Hill; Company C. Johnston Light Infantry, Capt. Shead; Company D, Newbern Light Infantry, Capt. Brookfield; Company E, Rowan Boys, Capt. Reves; Company F, Bertie Boys, Capt. Garnett; Company G, Dixie Defenders, Capt. Goddin; Company H, Gates Minute Men, Capt. Doudge.
unsatisfactory reports. Some to whom we have applied, and who ought to know the facts, for they have reached here from the neighborhood of Rich Mountain, assure us that it was impossible to obtain anything reliable there; some assure us that Gen. Garnett was killed, and others positively state that there is not a word of truth in the statement. The same vexed, uncertain and unsatisfactory reports reach us in relation to the fight at Rich Mountain, and we are compelled to come to the conclueceived in this city yesterday, addressed to Mrs. Gen. Pegram, mother of Col. Pegram, reported to have been killed: "Greenbrier" River, July 13, 1861. "Col. Pegram was not hurt nor injured in the battle of Rich Mountain. We parted late after the fight, and he has gone to join Gen. Garnett. I am here with five companies of the regiment. "Deeply regretting that you should have been annoyed by the report of his fall, I remain the warm friend of your noble son, "Nat. Tyler."
Latest from Gen. Garnett's command.Gen. Garnett's death probably unfounded. Louisville, July 16. --Gen. Garnett's forces did not exceed 5,000, and Gen. M'Clellan's Federal forces were about Gen. Garnett's death probably unfounded. Louisville, July 16. --Gen. Garnett's forces did not exceed 5,000, and Gen. M'Clellan's Federal forces were about 22,000. The Federal troops were in three columns. Gen. Norris had flanked the Southern troops on the north; Gen. M'Clellan approached on the south, and Gen. Rosencrantz advanced in front. Gen. GarnGen. Garnett's forces did not exceed 5,000, and Gen. M'Clellan's Federal forces were about 22,000. The Federal troops were in three columns. Gen. Norris had flanked the Southern troops on the north; Gen. M'Clellan approached on the south, and Gen. Rosencrantz advanced in front. Gen. Garnett's command stood their ground to the last possible moment of safety, and the retreat must have been admirably managed, as the pursuers had no opportunity of using their small arms. This was owing Gen. Garnett's command stood their ground to the last possible moment of safety, and the retreat must have been admirably managed, as the pursuers had no opportunity of using their small arms. This was owing to the fact that the rear was well guarded. In the retreat of the Confederate troops, they were twice outflanked by convergent columns. At the last accounts only twenty of the Southern troops we at Oakland, would harass the Confederates in their retreat towards Hardy county. It must be remembered that Gen. Garnett's troops have kept Gen. McClellan's columns in check for several weeks.