Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 20, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Garnett or search for Garnett in all documents.

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) that they are there as prisoners, with about 500 others of the troops which were at Rich Mountain under Colonels Heck and Pegram. The retreat was made through the woods to the road leading from Beverly to Laurel Hill, with a view of joining Gen. Garnett; but finding that he had left, and the post was in the hands of the enemy, who also held Beverly, they had no alternative except to surrender, or undertake the hopeless task of pushing across Cheat Mountain, without provisions, or the means ofern warfare shows few examples of a better contested field than was this engagement of Cols. Heck and Pegram, with 12 or 1500 men against 9,000 of the enemy. The reports of killed and wounded are so conflicting that I will say nothing. Had Garnett been able to hold Laurel Hill, the retreat of Heck and Pegram would have resulted well, and with that of the five companies under Tyler, would have left the enemy but few captives to take charge of. The destination of the prisoners is not yet se
[special Dispatch to the Richmond Dispatch]affairs in the Northwest--safety of Gen.Garnett's command — capture of prisoners. Staunton, Va. July 19. --An Aid-de-camp of General Garnett's arrived here this morning and reports that all the troops of his command, except thirty, have succeeded in reaching Monterey and are now there. A strong force of Confederate troops is being concentrated there. A number of Col. Pegram's command, who were paroled by Gen. McClellan after their surreGeneral Garnett's arrived here this morning and reports that all the troops of his command, except thirty, have succeeded in reaching Monterey and are now there. A strong force of Confederate troops is being concentrated there. A number of Col. Pegram's command, who were paroled by Gen. McClellan after their surrender, have arrived here. About three thousand troops arrived here to-day. The militia are turning cut en masse, and such a militia as any nation, much less Yankees, might fear. A volunteer from Arkansas, named Baldwin, was killed here Wednesday, by falling from the top of a car. His legs were cut off by the wheels, and his body otherwise mangled. Twenty-one prisoners were brought in last night from Beverly by our men. They were all "Union" men with the exception of one, who