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Killed and wounded at the battle of Stone Bridge, Sunday, July 21st. The following is a partial list of killed and wounded obtained from officers and privates at Manassas by a correspondent of the Enquirer: Second Virginia Regiment. Colonel Nelson, mortally wounded. Botts' Greys--Private Manning, mortally wounded; private Timberlake, mortally wounded; private Eiscler, mortally wounded; private Middlekeff, slightly wounded. Fourth Virginia Regiment. Rockbridge Grays--Private Goolsby, mortally wounded; private Cox, mortally wounded; private Marstella, slightly wounded. Montgomery Fencibles--Lieut. Langhorn, slightly wounded. Fourth Alabama Regiment. Lieutenant John Simpson, Company H, probably killed. Privates James Jackson, of Florence, wounded; Tom Kirkham, of Florence, wounded; Colonel Jones, severely wounded; Lieutenant Laws. wounded; Major Scott, wounded; Chas. Weem, wounded. Second Virginia Regiment. Captain Roan, mortally wounde
The battle at Stone Bridge. We give this morning a full and graphic narration of the great battle fought on Sunday last at Stone Bridge, from our special correspondent, who was on the spot and witnessed the fearful scenes which he describes. That in such a conflict victory should have rested upon our banners, will be viewed by the world as an assurance of the moral and physical power of the Confederate States. The battle at Stone Bridge. We give this morning a full and graphic narration of the great battle fought on Sunday last at Stone Bridge, from our special correspondent, who was on the spot and witnessed the fearful scenes which he describes. That in such a conflict victory should have rested upon our banners, will be viewed by the world as an assurance of the moral and physical power of the Confederate States.
The battle of Stone Bridge.written by an eye-witness. [special Correspondence of the Dispatch.] Manassas Junction, July 22. By Divine favor we are again victorious. To God be the glory. The armies of the North and South yesterday faced each other — the former not less than 50,000 men, the latter not exceeding 30,000athering in great force, and designed turning our left flank, which rested a few miles above the scene of Thursday's engagement, at a ford on Bull's Run called Stone Bridge. We retired to rest under the full conviction that on the morrow the fortunes of our young nation were to be staked on a mighty contest, and we were not dral Longstreet's position in his entrenchments on this side of the Run. General Evans, of South Carolina, was the first to lead his Brigade into action at Stone Bridge. It consisted of the Fourth South Carolina Regiment and Wheat's Louisiana Battalion. Sustaining them, was General Cocke's Brigade, consisting of the 17th and
The battle at Stone Bridge. Mr. Pritchard, of the Associated Press, furnishes the annexed: From a very intelligent and reliable gentleman from South Carolina, who was on the battle- field, and who held a prominent position there, I have obtained the following statement: South Carolina had seven regiments (including the Hampton Legion) on the battle-ground near Manassas on Sunday last. The Second Regiment, commanded by Col. Kershaw, was in the hottest of the fight. Col. Cash, of the Eighth Regiment, was with Col. Kershaw, and those regiments brigaded together. Col. Sloan's Fourth Regiment was the first which engaged the enemy; it opened the ball. It was stationed three miles to the left of the other South Carolina regiments, and, with the Louisiana troops, suffered considerably. Adjutant Wilkes, Lieut. Earle, and other officers, were killed. Captain Poole was severely, if not mortally, wounded. Captain Kilpatrick was also wounded, and, it is feared, severe
Accounts from Northern sources,the recent battles, &c. From Baltimore papers of the 22d inst., we make up a summary of recent events, which, however, do not reach the close of the great battle on Sunday at Stone Bridge. These accounts, it must be remembered, are thoroughly Black Republican, and we give them for what they are worth: The battle of Bull's Run. Washington, July 21--P. M. The telegraph, doubtless, has kept you advised of leading facts up to the present writing. Rumo not know, at eighty thousand, is calculated to beget the idea of a terrible conflict when it does take place. The Federal army, however, is said to be fully adequate to the emergency; large as can be wielded to advantage. The battle of Stone Bridge. The Baltimore Sun, of Monday last, is filled with what are called "Highly Interesting Details of the Battle," and from these details we learn what was meant, in the beginning of our Washington dispatches yesterday, by "Our troops, after ga