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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 84 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 58 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 22 20 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 14 8 Browse Search
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry 12 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 12 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 25, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Centreville (Virginia, United States) or search for Centreville (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Excesses of the Federal troops. --A correspondent of the Philadelphia' Inquirer writes: There is no doubt that some of our soldiers committed great excesses, both at Fairfax and Centerville. Not only were houses burned down, but furniture, pictures and mirrors were destroyed. This is the result of the teachings of those abolition newspapers which promised all the soldiers a farm in Virginia, and of those Congressmen who practically assert in their speeches that slaveholders, whether Union men or Secessionists, have no rights which the army is bound to respect.
rters, and which was pieces artillery, drive back ingloriously a force exceeding 35,000, supported by nearly a hundred pieces of cannon. I believe the official reports will sustain me in the assertion that General Beauregard did not bring more than fifteen thousand men into the action.--The total force under Gen. McDowell was over 50,000, but 35,000 will probably cover the force in action at the Stone Bridge. Many of the prisoners say that General Scott slept on Saturday night at Centerville, and was within two miles of his lines on Sunday in his carriage. Whether this be so or not, this defeat is his, and the first he ever suffered; but the men who fought and won his battles were now arrayed against him, and they were determined not to be conquered. Secretary Cameron, of the War Department, Washington, was also stated to have been on the field, in company with Mr. Ely, Congressman from the Rochester District, N. Y., who was captured, and Senator Foster, of Connecticut.
eresting Details of the Battle," and from these details we learn what was meant, in the beginning of our Washington dispatches yesterday, by "Our troops, after gaining a great victory, were repulsed, and forced to fall back on Washington." Without tiring our readers with the lying dispatches, sent at intervals to Washington all day Sunday, we copy the summary of the whole. If there was ever a greater tissue of falsehoods published, it has escaped our observation. It is as follows: Centerville, July 21--P. M.--A most severe and general battle was fought to-day at Bull's Run Bridge. The conflict was most desperate and bloody, lasting over nine hours. The programme of the battle, as stated in my first dispatch, was carried out until the troops met a succession of masked batteries, which were attacked with great vigor and bravery, and successively alarmed and taken, (1) with severe loss of life. Our troops advanced as follows: Col. Richardson, who distinguished himself