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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 836 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 690 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 532 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 480 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 406 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 350 0 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 332 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 322 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 310 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 294 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 25, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Missouri (Missouri, United States) or search for Missouri (Missouri, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 5 document sections:

t from the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad depot, the rear of the regiment was hissed and threatened by a party of men who were standing at the Lexington market, and policeman Brown arrested Geo. Curlinger and John Kummer; the former on a charge of inciting a riot by insulting soldiers on the street, and the latter for disturbing the peace, &c. They were taken to the station house and in the morning released by Justice Shipley in the sum of $300 to appear at the Criminal Court. The war in Missouri. Kansas City, Mo., July 19. --The Fort Scott Democrat, of the 18th, furnishes the following items: Gen. Lyon, who is marching South towards Springfield, has about 6,000 men, including Major Sturgess' command. He has also 24 pieces of field artillery, of various descriptions, an abundance of ammunition, and a full train of baggage wagons. McCullough and Jackson have retreated across the Arkansas line for the purpose of drilling their troops. Their available force is estim
Stocks in New York. --In New York, on Saturday morning last, Government coupons 6's of 1881 opened at 90 and fell to 89. Southern stocks sold as follows: Louisiana 6's 57½ North Carolina's 58¼; Tennessee's 43¾; Virginia's 47; Missouri's 44¾; and Georgia's 6
uly 23. -- Senate, a bill was passed allowing the transportasion of munitions of war to loyal citizens in the Confederate States. The bill also makes appropriations to the amount of $2,000,000. In the House, a bill was passed abolishing the District Courts in Kentucky and Missouri, and dividing Kentucky into two Judicial Districts, and Missouri into one. 79, nays 50. Mr. Crittenden opposed the bill as an abuse of power on the part of Congress and an innovation of the Constitution. uly 23. -- Senate, a bill was passed allowing the transportasion of munitions of war to loyal citizens in the Confederate States. The bill also makes appropriations to the amount of $2,000,000. In the House, a bill was passed abolishing the District Courts in Kentucky and Missouri, and dividing Kentucky into two Judicial Districts, and Missouri into one. 79, nays 50. Mr. Crittenden opposed the bill as an abuse of power on the part of Congress and an innovation of the Constitution.
due. He says that, from the very first, Lincoln's course has been all he could have wished — his self- chosen position as President of a party, and not of a nation — his refusal to answer all questions — his pitiful sneaking through Maryland--his Inaugural, calculated to alarm his enemies, without warning his friends — his Proclamation, calling out an army to wash out every vestige of liberty and independence in the South. His reign of terror in Maryland, the butcheries of his hirelings in Missouri, his barbarous threats of banging prisoners, the brutalities of his soldiers to helpless women, his wanton sacrifice of every principle of Christianity, free government and constitutional law, have placed the restoration of the Union beyond the range of possibility. His displacement of old and tried officers, the suspicion shown towards many of those who were national, the institution of new test oaths, and his refusal to allow the observance of the parole of honor given by the officers c
Brief ceremony. --When old Squire Crane was first elevated to the dignity of Justice of the Peace, down in Southwestern Missouri, he knew less of law and legal forms than he did about killing "bars" It was my fortune to be a witness of the first marriage ceremony the old fellow ever undertook. The young couple stood up in the Squire's office, and the happy bridegroom desired the functionary to "propel"--to which impatient request be acceded, by inquiring: "Miss Susan Roots, do you love that arman?" "Nothing shorter," responded Miss Roots in a subdued laugh. "And you, John Kenan, do you allow for to take Sue for better and worse?" "Sartin as shooting, Squire," earnestly responded the enamored John, chucking Sue under the chin. "Then, you both individually, collectively, now promise to love, honor and obey each other, without end?" A satisfactory reply was given. "If that 'ar be the case," continued the magistrate, "know all men by these present