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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 682 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 358 0 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 258 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 208 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 204 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 182 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 104 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 102 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 86 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 72 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 26, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Illinois (Illinois, United States) or search for Illinois (Illinois, United States) in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: July 26, 1861., [Electronic resource], A Federal Congressman on the fight at Bull Run. (search)
A Federal Congressman on the fight at Bull Run. In a letter published in the Baltimore Sun of Saturday, from the Hon. Wm. A. Richardson, member of Congress from Illinois, who professes to be an eye-witness of the scene of the engagement at Bull Run, he states that the action was commenced by Gen. Tyler, of Connecticut, at half-past 1 o'clock on Thursday--that the Michigan, Maine and Wisconsin regiments stood their ground bravely, while the New York Twelfth and Massachusetts regiments run with all their might, throwing away their arms, knapsacks, and in fact everything that impeded their progress. The men say that their officers lack courage and were the first to "take the back track." It seems that the only regiments who could be relied on in their greatest emergency were composed of foreigners — the New York 69th (Irish,) and the 79 the (Scotch.) The writer gives it as his opinion that Manassas cannot be taken with 50,000 men in two months, and that the North has been greatly d
elled to proceed by order, by a vote of the House. Ex-Gov. Thomas, of Maryland, replied most eloquently to his attack, defending the Government. There was great excitement throughout the debate, which lasted three hours. May, Burnett and Vallandigham consulted throughout the debate. Ancona, of Pennsylvania, to-day, joined the ranks of Northern traitors, and tried very unbecomingly to prevent Gov. Thomas, of Md., from replying to May. A bitter feeling against him exists among the Pennsylvania members. The city was intensely excited yesterday and to-day over the war news from Virginia. The wildest reports were flying to-day. The Senate indulged in an exciting debate on the war and slavery. Jim Lane, Powell, Carlile and others participated in it. Bright, of Indiana, wallowed in doughfaccism, as usual. Browning, of Illinois, made the best speech of the debate. The general sentiment of Northern speeches seemed to be, if slavery stood in the way of Union, it must fall.
Northern Congress. In the Washington House of Representative on Friday, July 19, the following processors tr: Mr. Kell , of Illinois, moved that when the house ourn it be till Monday. Voices.--Do you want to go to Manassas? Let's go. Mr. Washburne, of Illinois, before voting, wished to know whether the Committee of Ways and Mean had any business to report? Mr. Cox, of Ohio, objected to the question being asked, the object being, he said, to go to Manassas to get in thIllinois, before voting, wished to know whether the Committee of Ways and Mean had any business to report? Mr. Cox, of Ohio, objected to the question being asked, the object being, he said, to go to Manassas to get in the way of our soldiers.--[Lighter.] The House refused to adjourn over to Monday by a vote of 42 against . Mr. Crittenden, of Kentucky, asked leave to submit resolutions declaring that the present civil war has been forced on us by disunionist in the Southern States now in rebellion against the Government. That in this national emergency Congress, banishing all feelings of passion and resentment, will recollect only their duty to their country. That the war is not waged for conquest o