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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 31 7 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 17 1 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 14 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 13 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 12 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 11 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 3, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Corse or search for Corse in all documents.

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went a shout! Oh! how grand it was ! Imagine the quiet woods through which the watching bayonets glittered silently, suddenly alive with triumphant hurrahs ! From right to left, and left to right, for seven miles they were repeated ! Then came the order to advance, and as we left the woods and gained the high and open ground, the grandest spectacle I ever saw men my eyes. Company after company, regiment after regiment, brigade after brigade, army after army of our troops appeared. We halted to enjoy the sight, and as our glorious artillery and dashing cavalry spurred by in pursuit, shout after shout rent the air. General Longstreet, our Brigade Commander, rode, along our line with his staff, and thousands of men flung their caps in the air, or swung them on their bayonets. Col. Corse, our gallant little Colonel got his meed of hurrahs; and, an old negro who rode by with his gun, got no small salute. And, then the sunset came in a perfect glory of light sifted through the leaves.
tant effect upon the battle of Sunday, the 21st. In both cases the flight of the enemy was most precipitate and disastrous. Gen. Longstreet's Brigade, consisting of 1st Regiment Virginia Volunteers, commanded by Col. Moore; 17th Regiment, Col. Corse, and 11th Regiment, Col. Garland, were ordered under arms and marched in ten minutes out of camp at Manassas on the morning of the 17th, and in quick time reached Bull Run, some four miles distant. We were posted in a bend or horse-shoe of the rtillery, bore the brunt of the whole fight. Where every one fought to well, it were invidious to particularize. Col. Moore, of the 1st, was wounded in the arm, and the command devolved on Lt. Col. Fry, who was assisted by Major Skinner.--Col. Corse, Lt. Col. Munford, and Adjutant Humphreys of the 17th, and Major Brent, were off the field in command in different parts of it. All these officers were in the thickest of the fight and displayed the almost coolness and courage. But nothing cou