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Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 309 19 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 309 19 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 170 20 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 117 33 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 65 11 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 62 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 36 2 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 34 12 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 29 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 29 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 9, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Butler or search for Butler in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Gen. Butler. The redoubtable chieftain of Old Point exhibits his peculiar propensities to the last. A Washington dispatch, of August 5th, gravely announces. " Gen. Butler, in a letter to the Secretary of War, says that the withdrawing of his forces interferes with his scheme for capturing a large number of slaves." A magnifGen. Butler, in a letter to the Secretary of War, says that the withdrawing of his forces interferes with his scheme for capturing a large number of slaves." A magnificent "scheme," worthy the genius, courage, ambition, honesty and decency of Major General Butler! Where he expected to capture them, and what he intended to do with the sable "contraband," he does not vouchsafe to state. But the scheme is in perfect keeping with the whole of his house burning and property-stealing career in VirgMajor General Butler! Where he expected to capture them, and what he intended to do with the sable "contraband," he does not vouchsafe to state. But the scheme is in perfect keeping with the whole of his house burning and property-stealing career in Virginia; a career that is ignoble and contemptible beyond anything in the annals of war, and which has not a single spark of the redeeming virtue of courage to illumine its dark and repulsive features. What a "lame and impotent conclusion," of the campaign and Commander that was to subjugate Tidewater Virginia. He came, boasting th
racter, Objects and plans. The army correspondent of the New Orleans Picayune, writing from Manassas on the 29th of July, makes some revelations which, even at this late day, are worthy of perusal: The statements of prisoners and accidental occurrences are hourly throwing new and important light upon the late expedition of Gen. Scott, even upon his inmost plans and thoughts. It is now clear that the men brought together on the upper Potomac under Gen. Patterson, and those under General Butler at Fortress Monroe, were never designed to act separately, or, except as skirmishing parties. The movements in both these directions were, in fact, feints, designed to divide and distract us. The grand expedition which was to do the principal work of the invasion, was that fitted out at Washington, and directed against this place. Every man that could be made available for this object was there joined to it, every piece of artillery brought ul and every resource exhausted. Fo
The Daily Dispatch: August 9, 1861., [Electronic resource], Remarkable instance of Canine attachment (search)
erly posted, could have driven them off the field; but the force was not at hand. They charged among the teamsters and created a panic, which was more destructive than their swords. Capt. Dolliver remarked to Dr. Russell that he thought the troops from the front as they came up would stop their retreat at a certain point; but the Doctor said,"No, they are all more or less infected; it is painful — very painful; so we must look out to make good our own retreat." Capt. Dolliver and Dr. Russell retreated in company until all danger from the victorious rebels was past. Capt. Dolliver, says that the men suffered much from want of water, and that they had been inspired with the hope of water, and that they had been inspired with the hope of Gen. Butler bearing down upon one flank and Gen. Patterson upon the other, while they drove in the centre. They fought confident that victory was within their grasp, and knew not the disaster in the rear until too late to retrieve it.