Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 9, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Old Point (North Carolina, United States) or search for Old Point (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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ews, as stated by telegraph, is untrue. A gentleman from a point near that locality assures us, with the aid of his spy glass he can distinctly see the movements of the enemy. There is still a number of troops at that point, to guard the large fort they have erected. He says the night light seen there on Monday was due to the burning of brush, so that you may dismiss the idea that any conflagration of importance has taken place. Three large steamers came in yesterday and touched at Old Point. One of them was literally packed with troops. A bright light was seen in the direction of James river on Tuesday night, about 11 or 12 o'clock, and, as it was the water, many believe, that it was a vessel on fire. We incline to that belief. It may be proper to add that the Federals have erected a large fort at Newport News, and made an entrenchment around it. They are well fortified in every respect. The loud sounds of drums and unusual noise at our many posts, we heard on
Gen. Butler. The redoubtable chieftain of Old Point exhibits his peculiar propensities to the last. A Washington dispatch, of August 5th, gravely announces. " Gen. Butler, in a letter to the Secretary of War, says that the withdrawing of his forces interferes with his scheme for capturing a large number of slaves." A magnificent "scheme," worthy the genius, courage, ambition, honesty and decency of Major General Butler! Where he expected to capture them, and what he intended to do with the sable "contraband," he does not vouchsafe to state. But the scheme is in perfect keeping with the whole of his house burning and property-stealing career in Virginia; a career that is ignoble and contemptible beyond anything in the annals of war, and which has not a single spark of the redeeming virtue of courage to illumine its dark and repulsive features. What a "lame and impotent conclusion," of the campaign and Commander that was to subjugate Tidewater Virginia. He came, boasting tha