Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 9, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Hampton (Virginia, United States) or search for Hampton (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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The burning of Hampton. The news of this last crowning act of barbarity seems to be confirmed. The quiet, unoffending old village, which even the British spared in the late war, has been converted into a heap of ashes by the Black Republican invaders. A more wanton, unprovoked and infernal piece of pure diabolism was never committed. In this life of mysteries, the heart of man clings with fond tenacity to all that has an appearance of permanence and certainly, and therefore about the homestead which he was born in, where he has felt a mother's love and a father's care, where he has played with brothers and sisters, and indulged all the sweetest dreams, joys, hopes, affections and aspirations of humanity, his heart clings as to an anchor that holds it steady and yet buoyant amid all the fluctuations of human affairs. Around the native house every tendril of his heart is entwined, mantling it as the green vine does the wall, and making the dull, inanimate materials fragran
Outrages at Hampton. --The following, from the Fortress Monroe correspondence of the New York Herald, gives further information of the outrages committed by the Hessians at Hampton, previous to burning the town: The exodus of negroes from Hampton continued all day yesterday, and from the appearance that that unfortunate village presents, very little of value has been left there by these sable itinerants and by the soldiers, who have, I regret to say, committed not a few excesses anHampton, previous to burning the town: The exodus of negroes from Hampton continued all day yesterday, and from the appearance that that unfortunate village presents, very little of value has been left there by these sable itinerants and by the soldiers, who have, I regret to say, committed not a few excesses and acts of violence. They have wantonly destroyed many articles of no earthly use to them, and taken off many others that they have found in the deserted houses that can be of no service to them. The spirit of mischief that sometimes seizes upon men is something that I cannot account for, and one cannot but feel indignant and outraged when he witnesses the ruin that marks the presence of some men. These outrages call for some more stringent-regulations upon the part of the authorities here, if
War matters --The intelligence of the burning of the remnant of Hampton by the invaders, occasioned a good deal of indignation yesterday. This is the only news of any importance from the Peninsula. A private letter from an officer, dated August 31 mentions the movements of our troops in the vicinity of Hampton, and says: "Gen. Batien had every opportunity to give us fight, but held off" An improbable story that General Magruder had commenced the siege of Fortress Monroe, was in circulation yesterday.--Gentlemen who arrived in the afternoon, direct from Yorktown, report everything quiet. The story of the evacuation of Newport News, by the Federals, is now disbelieved. The conjunction of the forces of Generals Wise and Floyd, at White Sulphur Springs has been effected, though it is hardly probable that they will long occupy that locality. We are assured that no backward movementwill be made. From our troops on the Potomac line there is no news, either exciting
[special correspondence of the Dispatch.] Norfolk, Va., August 8, 1861. The town of Hampton was fired last night by the Federals. It is believed that all the most prominent buildings were consumed. The fire raged about 12 o'clock or later, and should be distinctly seen at many of our posts. Further particulars we have not heard, but you may rely upon this statement as correct Various conjectures are afloat as to the object of this act. We can place no dependence upon the actions of men given to such wanton outrages. Four steamers were off Newport News yesterday. Two or three steamers went up James River yesterday. The burning of the buildings at Newport News, as stated by telegraph, is untrue. A gentleman from a point near that locality assures us, with the aid of his spy glass he can distinctly see the movements of the enemy. There is still a number of troops at that point, to guard the large fort they have erected. He says the night light seen there on Monday
The town of Hampton Burnt by the Hessians. Norfolk. Aug. 8 A large fire was discovered last night about 1 o'clock in the immediate location of Hampton. It continued its flames until about 3 o'clock this morning. The impression here is, that the Federals have burned Hampton Several prominent house there were recognized by some our citizen to have been in flames. From an elevated position, and with the use of glasses, they seem confident that Hampton is in ashes, and the further inference is that the Federals have evacuated that place. [Second Dispatch] Norfolk, August 8 1 o'clock P. M. --Burning of Hampton has been confirmed by the statements of several officers who have just reached here from Craney Island. Dense smoke continues to ascend, and the opinion is that the burning still continues. The flames last night were intense, and the reflection of them on our steeples was plainly visible, although Hampton is about sixteen miles from Norfolk.