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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 836 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 690 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 532 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 480 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 406 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 350 0 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 332 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 322 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 310 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 294 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 19, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Missouri (Missouri, United States) or search for Missouri (Missouri, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 17 results in 10 document sections:

Latest News,byspecial expresses. The Battle in Missouri--More Northern Accounts — Suppression of Newspapers — Affairs on the Potomac — Arrest of a British Subject — War Movements, &c., &c. From late Northern papers, received at this office, we make up the following summary of news: Later from Missouri. St. Louis, August 14 --Provost Marshal McKinstry has issued a proclamation calling upon all good citizens to obey the rules it has been deemed necessary to establish, in ordMissouri. St. Louis, August 14 --Provost Marshal McKinstry has issued a proclamation calling upon all good citizens to obey the rules it has been deemed necessary to establish, in order to insure and preserve the public peace. The civil law will remain in force, and military authority only be used when the civil law proves inadequate to maintain the public safety. Any violation of this order will be followed by prompt punishment, regardless of persons or positions. The Evening Missourian and Bulletin, two secession papers, have been suppressed. The reports that Gen. Hardee is marching on Pilot Knob, and of the destruction of the bridges on the Iron Mountain Rail
From Norfolk.[special correspondence of the Dispatch.] Norfolk, Aug. 16th, 1861. The news of the glorious victory in Missouri that the Yankee hirelings and minions have been routed, was received here with joyous feelings, exciting lively emotions of delight in many a true Southern heart. Today our city is comparatively quiet, and with regard to wholesale business operations, Norfolk is, of course, a dull place. The hotels and boarding-houses, however, are very extensively patronized — some of them crowded, principally by brave Southerners, who have come hither at the trumpet call to battle, ready and eager for the contest with any number of misguided Northern fanatics, thieves and cut-throats, who may dare to attempt a landing upon our shores. The monotonous tramp of squads of soldiers, the rumble of army wagons, and the rapid galloping of war-steeds, give a military appearance to our streets; such evidences of war as are also common in your city of hills and inclined
The Daily Dispatch: August 19, 1861., [Electronic resource], Sketch of the life of Ben McCullough. (search)
tored by the State Legislature, is organizing the disunionists in the lower counties of Maryland. He is about to proceed to Accomac, take command of the Virginia forces there, and march them up into the middle of the Eastern Shore of Maryland, as the nucleus for the formation of a rebel army there, which shall, if it can do nothing else, control the elections in the fall so as to secure a disunion majority in the Legislature, and enable the Secessionists to pass a Secession Ordinance, or perhaps more immediately enforce an Ordinance of Secession that may be passed by the present Legislature at its adjourned session. The Late Battle in Missouri--The people in the North are beginning to open their eyes. The New York Post has the following: But a victory which costs such a man and such a General as Lyon, and is followed by a retreat, and then a second retreat, belongs decidedly to that class of which a renowned General said that "a few more such victories would ruin him."
son conveyed in these two memorable examples. He made the most extraordinary efforts to conceal the terrible catastrophe which has overtaken the Federal arms in Missouri. He telegraphed to all quarters of Yankeedom, that the Federalists had obtained a signal triumph. And yet, in spite of all his efforts at concealment, he was c and Polk were on the point of joining McCulloch, and that the whole force would move directly upon St. Louis. We already regard the Confederate cause as won in Missouri. We regard Missouri as not less certainly than Virginia a member of the great Southern Republic. Praise be to Him to to whom all praise is due for the gloriousn the point of joining McCulloch, and that the whole force would move directly upon St. Louis. We already regard the Confederate cause as won in Missouri. We regard Missouri as not less certainly than Virginia a member of the great Southern Republic. Praise be to Him to to whom all praise is due for the glorious consummation.
Still Later. Another Installment of Northern News — The Skirmish on the Potomac — Firing at Aquia Creek — Affairs in Missouri--Later from Fortress Monroe, &c., &c., &c., The special express yesterday brought us files of Northern journals, including New York dates of Friday, and Baltimore dates of Saturday last. The following is a summary of the latest news: Official report of the Skirmish on the Potomac. The following is Capt. Budd's report of this affair, made to Capt. Cravethe field of battle, they shall have proved their bravery. The names of the leaders in this revolt will be sent to the Governor of New York, to be placed in the archives of the State. A court-martial will be held forthwith." Further from Missouri. St Louis, August 15 --A fleet of 10 steamers, which have been laid up for some time past, was brought up to the city to-day by order of General Fremont, to prevent the possibility of their being taken by the Confederates. General P<
Latest from Missouri. St. Louis, Aug. 17. --A messenger from Gen. Siegel reports him fifteen miles this side of Rolla. He had not been molested. A New York Catholic Priest has been taken to a police station by a party of Dutchmen, who declared that he was a Secession Prest. He was confined in jail. Louisville, Aug. 17.--It is stated that Fremont's loan for a quarter of a million of dollars was forced. Depositors have been quietly drawing their money from the Banks. The St. Louis Democrat, of yesterday, expresses its assurance that Gen. Siegel's troops are safe. Another report says that he has only six hundred troops with him, as the other portion was cut off. The following is an extract from a letter dated St. Louis, Aug. 16th and from a perfectly reliable source: "Fremont is fortifying the envious. All information is suppressed. An employee on the railroad told a gentleman that he heard heavy firing, or cannonading in the direction of Rolla, b
llions of his loan taken, or rather proposals have been made to that extent, by the Banks of Boston, Philadelphia, and New York, the same being payable in quarterly instalments — say fifty millions every three months, in the currency of the Banks, they taking Treasury notes as security at the rate of seven and three-tenths. The Banks expect to have the first payment returned to them in deposits before the second is due, and this arrangement is an indication that they lock upon peace as more than probable before three months are ended. All the passengers who have lately arrived from that section concur in the belief that the process of disintegration in the North has begun and is going on hopefully; that the Northern people are demoralized by the defeats at Manassas and in Missouri; that there are decided indications of peace, and that it is utterly hopeless to raise another army for the invasion and subjugation of the South, and very doubtful if they can even defend Washington.
News from Missouri. --We are informed that a private dispatch was received in this city on Saturday from a very reliable source in Arkansas, which states that at the recent battle near Springfield, Missouri, the Confederates lost, in killed, wounded, and prisoners, about one thousand, and the Federals lost twenty-five hundred in killed, wounded, and prisoners. General Lyon was killed. Six cannon were taken, besides a large amount of stores, wagons, &c., &c. The Federal rout was complete. Generals McCulloch and Price were in hot pursuit of the enemy, and they entertained confident hopes of capturing the whole of General Siegel's command.--Generals Hardee and Jeff. Thompson are moving to the northeast with a view of cutting off General Siegel's retreat towards St Louis.
Affairs in Missouri. The recent brilliant successes of the Confederate troops in Missouri have electrified every true Southern heart. Never has a State been more cruelly oppressed and treated; never in America have any but the Indians perpetraMissouri have electrified every true Southern heart. Never has a State been more cruelly oppressed and treated; never in America have any but the Indians perpetrated such inhuman butcheries as those in St. Louis, in which innocent citizens, and actually women and children, were shot down in cold blood by the myrmidons of Gen. Lyon and Gen. Siegel, the first of whom has happily been sent to his account. It is for false philanthropy, will find their mistake before long. The Avenger of Blood is on the heels of those ruffians in Missouri, and we trust will be are long in Maryland also, and then the long arrears will be paid. Oh, for that precious hour of issouri, and we trust will be are long in Maryland also, and then the long arrears will be paid. Oh, for that precious hour of a people's deliverance! We are sure it is at hand in Missouri. We fervently hope that Maryland will not be far behind.
Personal. Professor H. B. Todd, of Missouri, an ardent friend and advocate of the Southern cause has arrived in this city on business connected with his State.