Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 23, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Hunter or search for Hunter in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

but retreated with their battery on the approach of our troops. Their force was about 150 infantry, and the same number of cavalry. Cairo, August 20.--A fight took place last night, at 12 o'clock, at Charleston, on the Cairo and Fulton Railroad, between a Federal force consisting of the 22d Illinois regiment, under command of Colonel Dougherty accompanied by Colonel Rawson, of the 11th Illinois regiment. The Confederate force was estimated at from 600 to 700 men, commanded by Colonel Hunter, of Jeff. Thompson's army. The Federal force was victorious, completely routing the Confederates, killing 4 and taking 17 prisoners. The loss on our side was only one man killed, Wm. P. Sharp, of company "A." The defence of Washington, &c. Washington, Aug. 20. --As the only effective means of checking the designs of the enemy on Washington is to have a military force adequate for all possible contingencies, this will soon be supplied. The earnest measures of the Administr
sure of it, in consequence of the rear of the flight behind me. It was most surprising to see how the foot soldiers had contrived to get on in advance. Colonel Hunter wounded. After sunset the moon rose, and, amid other acquaintances, I jogged alongside an officer who was in charge of Colonel Hunter, the commander of a Colonel Hunter, the commander of a brigade, I believe, who was shot through the neck, and was inside a cart, escorted by a few troopers. This officer was, I understood, the major or second in command of Colonel Hunter's regiment, and he had considered it right to take charge of his chief and to leave his battalion. He said they had driven back the enemy with easeColonel Hunter's regiment, and he had considered it right to take charge of his chief and to leave his battalion. He said they had driven back the enemy with ease, but had not been supported, and blamed — as bad officers and good ones will do — the conduct of the General. "So mean a fight I never saw." I was reminded of a Crimean General who made us all merry by saying after the first bombardment, "In the whole course of my experience I never saw a siege conducted on such princip