Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 23, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Scott or search for Scott in all documents.

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had actually been ordered to make an attack on Manassas, and that Gen. Scott had given him till 12 o'clock to be master of Beauregard's lines. If Gen. Scott ordered the attack at all I venture to say he was merely the mouthpiece of the more violent civilians of the Government, who md wounded; I know it "I went out to the headquarters, and there General Scott and informed me Gen. McDowell's official report gave six killedy who rode the saddle horse. When I spoke with officers at General Scott's headquarters of the expedition, it struck me they were not at one can tell what may happen." But my friend got his pass from General Scott, who was taking the whole affair of Bull Run and the pressure o miles of them." "I can't let you pass, Sir." I bethought me of General Scott's pass The adjutant read it, and the word was given along the lot got it. But the officer passed me through on the production of Gen. Scott's safeguard. The lights of the city were in sight, and reflected
e will never recover from the horrors of Bull Run. The letter of this writer is before the public. Let them read it, and judge for themselves. --We shall only advert to one passage in it — that, namely, in which he says he learned a General Scott's headquarters that the loss of the Yankees on the 18th was only 47 killed and wounded. If General Scott lent his countenance to the propagation of such a lie as this, he is a more contemptible tool of the Yankees then we had even supposed him.--General Scott lent his countenance to the propagation of such a lie as this, he is a more contemptible tool of the Yankees then we had even supposed him.--The whole Yankee loss, on that occasion, has been well ascertained. It was 1,064 men killed and wounded, of whom more than sixty were buried on the field of battle. The article of the London Times is founded upon this letter of Russell's, and is eminently characteristic. It persists in making no distinction between the Southern people and the Yankees, although nature itself has created so marked a difference, and notwithstanding we are at war at this very moment. It classes us all as Am