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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16,340 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 3,098 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2,132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,974 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,668 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,628 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,386 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,340 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 1,170 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 1,092 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 29, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for United States (United States) or search for United States (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 25 results in 10 document sections:

e scheme is approved by the General commanding-in-chief of the forces in Virginia, as well as by the President, Secretary of War and Adjutant General of the Confederate States, and that orders have been issued by the authorities of Virginia to furnish the said battery with their guns, howitzers, carriages and artillery equipments,ed for the defence of the city; and whereas it is now believed by the Council that the Home Artillery will not, for some time, need the horses, and that the Confederate States are much in need of them: therefore, Resolved, That we offer the horses already purchased for the Home Artillery to the Confederate States, provided thhereas it is now believed by the Council that the Home Artillery will not, for some time, need the horses, and that the Confederate States are much in need of them: therefore, Resolved, That we offer the horses already purchased for the Home Artillery to the Confederate States, provided they will pay us cost for the same.
e enough. Benedict Arnold is a fair type of the race. The Yankee loves treason, and he took up for Great Britain in the war indicated because it was treason to do so. But ever since that day he has been bitterly hostile. Whenever he has had the power of shaping the policy of the General Government, that policy, in its foreign relations, seems to have been confined to acts which might annoy the British Government. The nigger and England.--These have been the only subjects on which the United States has had any policy for years. In the meantime, the ribaldry of the New York press whenever England has been concerned, has been a disgrace to civilization.--Even now, when the very existence of the Government depends upon the negotiation of a loan in Great Britain, the Herald, the Tribune, the Times--all the New York press — daily insult and vilify the British nation Yankeedom could not expect Great Britain to assist her for love. In the meantime, the necessities of Great Britain d
t in load water, is indeed very remarkable. The reader will be amused at Capt. Jones' allusion to the motive with which the Yankee officers have made their repeated parade of philanthropy in their pious pursuit of the body of the "lamented Cameron," They have brought into systematic and dally use the employment of donning the livery of Heaven to serve the Devil (or Lincoln) in: Messrs. Editors:--My name having been connected with the tortuous proceedings of certain officials of the United States deceased I beg leave to tax your columns as briefly as circumstances will admit. On the 23d ult. Major Wadsworth, of General McDowell's staff, a flag of truce, was stopped outside of our camp at Fairfax C. H. He bore a letter which was forwarded, and it seems came to inquire after missing officers. All in our possession that could alleviate distressed to milieus was willingly revealed, and such hospitalities as we could offer out of doors were placed at the service of our guests, whic
ing the summary forfeiture of vessels belonging in whole or in part to citizens or inhabitants of those States, which may be found at sea or in any part of the United States fifteen days after date of this warning. This it will be perceived is a very sweeping confiscation, though neither its justice or expediency would concern us in full play. Passports — shall we smile or sigh in writing it?--passports will hereafter be requisite for all persons entering or leaving by sea these United States of America! At a time when the more civilized portions of the world are gradually adopting unfettered interchange of commodities and unrestricted personal intercoud registered licenses to enter and leave its territories. The prisoners at Fort Lafayette. Arrests on suspicion of treasonable intercourse with the Confederate States are not rare, and in some cases there can be no doubt that they are justifiable; but what puzzles the on-looker is the treatment doled out to the captives.
The Daily Dispatch: August 29, 1861., [Electronic resource], An order from Lincoln's War Department. (search)
An order from Lincoln's War Department. A Washington dispatch to the New York Herald, dated Aug. 23d, says: "According to order No. 63, Captain Beverley H. Robertson, of the Second Cavalry, and First Lieutenant. W. T. Walker, of the Ordnance Department, having given proof of their disloyalty are dismissed from the service of the United States." Capt. Robertson, who is a native of Virginia, arrived in Richmond a few days ago, from Utah, and has since been appointed a Captain in the Confederate service.
m Surgeons and Assistant Surgeons of the army has been sent into Congress: To the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States: The memorial of the undersigned, Surgeons and Assistant Surgeons of the army of the Confederate States, respeConfederate States, respectfully represent that they have been much surprised and mortified that, by the military regulations under the Government of the Confederate States, the medical Corps have been deprived of a right (to wit, that of rank,) which, after the fullest inveConfederate States, the medical Corps have been deprived of a right (to wit, that of rank,) which, after the fullest investigation and the most earnest opposition, and, one may say, the fullest consideration, had been accorded to them by the Congress of the former United States years before Secession, and which had been everywhere acquiesced in, and by all considered sUnited States years before Secession, and which had been everywhere acquiesced in, and by all considered settled. We, who belonged to the army of the old Union, and who have enjoyed this right, (a vested one as we considered,) when invited to resign our positions in that Government, and enter the Provisional Confederate Government--with the assurance t
Garland, and a few weeks will probably show a capture of the whole force of this department. Their supplies from the United States are already cut off. The confidential orders to Major Lynde from the commander of the Department of New Mexico and Staunton, prepared to resist all attacks. Capt. George Frazier, of Mesilla, is organizing a company for the Confederate States service, to be called the Arizona Rangers. They are bold, hardy and unconquerable. The massacre of the mall p Buchanan and all its contents, and other property, amounting in the aggregate to half a million of dollars. The United States officers taken at the surrender of San Augustine Springs were the following: Major Isaac Lindee, commanding; Cap Santa Fe. Col. John R. Baylor had issued a proclamation taking possession of Arizona in the name of the Confederate States of America, and establishing temporarily and until the action of Congress a form of government. The Times adds:
hat which we have already cited. Another commercial letter, written at Charleston, was found in possession of Mr. Muir, from which we make the following extract: Mr. B. [Mr. Bunch, the British Consul at Charleston,] showed me confidentially Mr. Russell's letter about the battle. His letter beats all I have yet seen in print about the Yankees running. He says we could have had Washington by merely asking. He said Lord Lyons had an inclination to ask Mr. Seward "if the Confederate States of America had not the belligerent rights, according to his notion, he would certainly admit they had the belligerent power." On oath of secrecy he communicated to me also that the first step of recognition was taken.--He [Mr. Bunch, the British Consul,] and Mr. Belligny, French, Consul at Charleston, together, sent Mr. Trescott to Richmond yesterday to ask Jeff. Davis, President, to accept the treaty of commerce, to accept the neutral flag carrying central goods. This is the first step o
son of Mrs. Frances Wrean, we continued until to-day; R. A. Fish, a decent appearing person, was examined on suspicious of being a spy. Defendant, who represent himself as an Abolition Captain of a so-called "California Regiment," composed of New York out-throats, was apprehended near h Church, by Gen. Beauregard's scouts, and sent to Richmond. He seemed to take pleasure in knowing that his regiment was on Virginia soil this side of the Potomac. He was brought before Gen. Winder for examination. It appeared that Fish had been entrusted to the custody of a Confederate Captain to delivered here, and that the latter had not confined him allowing him, before his appearance before the Mayor, an honorary parole. This we from the Mayor. In as much as the charged may eventuate in the loss of his if proved, this seems to us a loose way of doing business. William, slave of Mary Quaries was arraigned, and ordered by the Mayor lashes for stealing timber owned by the Confederate States.
arrangement as may have been entered into between the Confederates and the United States. There are a great many contradictory reports as to the present and fural: Post-Office Department, Aug. 24, 1861. The President of the United States directs that his proclamation of the 16th inst., interdicting commercial intercourse with the so called Confederate States, shall be applied to correspondence with those States, and has devolved upon this department the enforcement of so mucrelating to the interdiction of commercial intercourse with the so-called Confederate States; and learning that it was intended to include letters, immediately issuedtain your right to govern yourselves under the Constitution and laws of the United States. To put an end to the savage war waged by individuals who, without warty respected, and only those who are found enemies of the Government of the United States and the peace of Western Virginia will be disturbed. Of these I shall requ