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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 388 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 347 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 217 51 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 164 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 153 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 146 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 132 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 128 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 128 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 122 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 2, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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ries. The public will devour the present report with the utmost avidity; it will be read with admiration abroad, and will command respect even among the Yankees. But its "success"--to use the booksellers' phrase — will be small in comparison with the forthcoming description of the "battle." All those who are desirous to possess a narrative of this campaign, at once clear comprehensive, and elegant, should preserve Beauregard's reports as they come out.--They will be invaluable to the future historian. It will be observed that we make a distinction between the "combat" and the "battle" of Bull Run. It was not invented by us, but has always been employed by writers on military subjects. An engagement which is not general, but is participated in by only a part of the two armies, is a "combat." A "battle," technically, is a fight between the full force on both sides. A combat is frequently as bloody as the most severs pitched battle, and some times leads to as decisive results.
ked "A," their withdrawal within the lines of Bull Run was effected with complete success during theed him to anticipate an unresisted passage of Bull Run. As prescribed in the first and second sing of the 18th of July, my troops resting on Bull Run, from Union Mills ford to the Stone Bridge, ary thus occupied, it must suffice to say that Bull Run is a small stream, running, in this locality,s, from a hill over one and a half miles from Bull Run. At the same time Kemper, supported by two cr general results and events of the action of Bull Run, in conclusion it is proper to signalize someing and executing the retrograde movements on Bull Run, directed in my orders of the 8th July.--moveon of the returns from Fairfax Court House on Bull Run. Called from the head of his regiment by whace, to fall back and fight him on the line of Bull Run; yet the position occupied by Gen. Ewell's Brthe occupation and maintenance of the line of Bull Run. Col. Thomas Jordan, A. Adjutant General[2 more...]
l be able to follow our description. It must be borne in mind that it is now five weeks since the defeat of our army at Bull Run; that that defeat has had the effect of an electric shock throughout the whole South; that it has aroused the enthusiasmFalls Church, at Vienna, at Fairfax, at Centreville, and at Germantown. The great Parrott gun, captured by the enemy at Bull Run, has been brought up by them to Bailey's Cross Roads, and was placed in a position there yesterday behind their entrenchs are as nothing against entrenchments, while behind them they are almost as good as veterans. This was our weakness at Bull Run; it will be our strength in the ensuing fight. But it is useless to speculate. If we lose Washington, it will be worsehe same means with which she chained the North with the Walker tariff, and that two or three more successes like that of Bull Run would entitle the Slavocracy to immediate recognition. Disloyal employees. Washington, Aug. 30 --Of the all
f no mutinies, no disturbances, no murmuring, no lack of confidence in the skill or judgment of their officers. All their privations seem cheerful to be borne for the sake of the cause in which they are collected. If Northern accounts of the Northern army are to be credited, no Southern man can fall to be proud of the morale of our men compared with theirs Of the superiority of Southern courage and skill we need not speak, after the testimony of such witnesses as the battles of Bethel and Bull Run. But not a few have been disappointed at the endurance of our Southern men, on the score of the fatigues and privations of the camp. We see among our soldiers men who have been always used to all the comforts and luxuries of their homes, always accustomed to command, now doing their own cooking, taking care of their own horses, and yielding a cheerful obedience to every military order. Can such a people be subjugated? There has been and still is considerable sickness among the soldi