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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,604 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 760 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 530 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 404 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 382 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 346 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 330 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 312 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 312 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 310 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 3, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) or search for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 5 document sections:

Crescent City Bank. Mechanics' and Traders' Bank. Merchants' Bank. New Orleans Canal and Banking Company. Union Bank of Louisiana. Southern Bank. Tennessee. Bank of Tennessee and Branches. Planters' Bank of Tennessee and Branches. Union Bank of Tennessee and Branches. Bank of Memphis. Bank of Chattanoognt City Bank. Mechanics' and Traders' Bank. Merchants' Bank. New Orleans Canal and Banking Company. Union Bank of Louisiana. Southern Bank. Tennessee. Bank of Tennessee and Branches. Planters' Bank of Tennessee and Branches. Union Bank of Tennessee and Branches. Bank of Memphis. Bank of Chattanooga. nt City Bank. Mechanics' and Traders' Bank. Merchants' Bank. New Orleans Canal and Banking Company. Union Bank of Louisiana. Southern Bank. Tennessee. Bank of Tennessee and Branches. Planters' Bank of Tennessee and Branches. Union Bank of Tennessee and Branches. Bank of Memphis. Bank of Chattanooga.
on men (!) of Carlile & Co's kingdom — Some of them are genteel looking fellows, the rest are rather scarce in the regular habiliments of Southerners — at least, not such as would satiate the desire of a connoisseur. The disaffected portion of Tennessee, not so beguiled eternally as those within the borders of the Old Dominion, begin to see the error of their ways and act accordingly. I received a letter from a very boisterous Union place in East Tennessee several days since, which states thaEast Tennessee several days since, which states that there is an unprecedented reflux of public opinion there, and thinks that the disaffection will soon be ferreted out under the strict military surveillance of Gen. Zellicoffer. The action in regard to Mr. Nelson is having a good effect. Their eyes are beginning to open, and they now begin to see that we have a Government worthy of a place on the enduring tablets of history, and a Government which, while it is able to maintain its supremacy, does not exercise a virulent disposition towards th
e success at Bull Run and the subsequent conduct of the Administration have had their natural effect. There is now an almost total change of sentiment. East Tennessee. The Knoxville Register brings some good news from East Tennessee, from which we extract the following: The temperate but firm measures adopted by tEast Tennessee, from which we extract the following: The temperate but firm measures adopted by the civil and military authorities of the State, are having the most happy effect in questing the excitement of the Union men of East Tennessee, and counteracting the mischief and exposing the wiles of the ambitious demagogues who have so long rankly abused the ears of the masses. A little wholesome restraint exercised upon these East Tennessee, and counteracting the mischief and exposing the wiles of the ambitious demagogues who have so long rankly abused the ears of the masses. A little wholesome restraint exercised upon these leaders, and the lesson administered to them that "treason will not be tolerated, " has had a magical effect in modifying their views and forcing upon them the conviction that there is no longer a Government at Washington to which they owe allegiance. Making a merit of necessity, those of them who have been arrested have graceful
on the 17th. By some means the mass of material became ignited, and he was burnt so severely that he died on the 10th, A. U. Tomlinson, of Remington, M. C. has put up a machine to run by steam to make shoe pegs, which the South has always heretofore been content to buy from the Yankees. The people of Tennessee were started by a heavy shock of an earthquake early on Friday morning last. George W. Bridges, of Tennessee, has been unconditionally released by General Zollis sooner, on the 17th. By some means the mass of material became ignited, and he was burnt so severely that he died on the 10th, A. U. Tomlinson, of Remington, M. C. has put up a machine to run by steam to make shoe pegs, which the South has always heretofore been content to buy from the Yankees. The people of Tennessee were started by a heavy shock of an earthquake early on Friday morning last. George W. Bridges, of Tennessee, has been unconditionally released by General Zollis sooner,
e is trying to keep up division, and thus to maintain the French preponderance. As soon as the tidings of the rout at Manassas arrived in Europe, M. Thouvenst received the agents of the Confederates, in an official way, indeed, but one more victory of the Secessionists would at once be followed by the recognition of the Southern Confederacy. Brownlow's Interpretation of the President's proclamation. Brownlow, in the Knoxville Whig, of the 24th ult., says: Many are leaving East Tennessee, as we are informed, under the impression that, after forty days, they will be forced to leave the State, and have their effects confiscated. Such is not the spirit and intent of the proclamation of Davis, or the act in pursuance of which the proclamation is issued. We advise all such to return to their own lawful pursuits and homes; and as a guarantee for their safety and protection, we refer to the order of General Zollicoffer. Men who are not found in arms against the State authori