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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 172 16 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 152 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 120 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 113 3 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 107 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 106 6 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 106 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 102 2 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 89 15 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 68 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 4, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Fremont or search for Fremont in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 2 document sections:

The proclamation of Fremont. The law officer of the Crown, in the old U. States--Attorney General Bater--is said, when asked whether the President had power to proclaim martial law, to have anseserve the Constitution." As the papers say he is now in Missouri, it is fair to infer that General Fremont has availed himself of his advice, in issuing the atrocious proclamation to which his name taken up for the purpose of defending their native soil against invasion. This is exactly what Fremont threatens to the citizens of Missouri. There was this excuse for the Duke of Brunswick; he wasthis occasion, the sentiments of which all the courts of Europe made haste to disavow. But Fremont and his adviser can offer no such excuse. They were raised in a country professing to be goveris the usual, as it is the best reward of small men, what will posterity say of them? Will Fremont carry his threat into execution? Will he murder the prisoners that may fall into his hands? W
will entitle the holders to Treasury notes on the terms already stated. The patriotism of the people, it is not to be doubted, will promptly respond to the liberal wisdom of their representatives. S. P. Chase,Secretary of the Treasury. Fremont's proclamation of martial law in Missouri. The telegraph has already informed us that Gen. Fremont, of the Federal army, had proclaimed martial law throughout the State of Missouri. We append the proclamation in full: Headquarters WestGen. Fremont, of the Federal army, had proclaimed martial law throughout the State of Missouri. We append the proclamation in full: Headquarters Western Department, St. Louis, August 30. Circumstances, in my judgment, of sufficient urgency, render it necessary that the Commanding General of this Department should assume the administrative powers of the State. Its disorganized condition — the helplessness of the civil authority — the total insecurity of life, and the devastation of property by bands of murderers and marauders, who infest nearly every county in the State, and avail themselves of the public misfortunes and the security o