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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 692 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 516 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 418 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War 358 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 298 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 230 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 190 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 186 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 182 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 4, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for France (France) or search for France (France) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 3 document sections:

w not where to find a parallel to this proclamation, except in that issued by the Duke of Brunswick, upon his invasion of France in 1793, for the purpose of putting down the revolution. That proclamation has received the execration of the whole civircised only for their benefit, must have been heard by him for the first time since the commencement of the revolution in France, although he had married a sister of George Ill, He, doubtless, regarded the revolutionists of France as rebels against tFrance as rebels against the Most High, and supposed it to be the duty of every good Christian to exterminate them with fire and sword. There was some palpitation, therefore, for the atrocious document which he put forth upon this occasion, the sentiments of which all the core not risk the trial. In the meantime his proclamation will have the same effect that Brunswick's proclamation had upon France. It will arouse the whole population. It will confirm the wavering, and drive the most resolute Union men into our rank
confident expectation that the war, prosecuted with energy, courage and skill, may be brought to a termination before the close of the next spring; in which event the cost, beyond the revenue, will hardly exceed the amount of the two hundred and fifty millions loan authorized by Congress. With due economy in all branches of the public service, the total expenditures for all objects, military, naval and civil, in this year of war, need not exceed the ordinary expenditures of Great Britain or France in years of peace. And is it unreasonable to hope that the auspicious result of peace may be hastened by the reflections of the citizens of the States is insurrection? That they will review their action; weigh their own welfare; consider the disposition of the people of the whole county to recognize all their constitutional rights and to allow them their full share in the benefits of the common Government, and renew their allegiance to the Union, which, in an evil hour, they have been
s the language of Mr. Russell Possibly, it is significant of the argument which will be hereafter employed by England and France to vindicate a future disregard of the blockade. They might long ago have treated it as a nullity, inasmuch as it has nes a violation of the treaties between the United States and foreign powers. Whence, then, the forbearance of England and France to violate the blockade? If they "are coming," why don't they "come along?" In answer, we can only say, that so long as England has a hope of obtaining cotton, or France tobacco, in any other way, they will not violate the blockade. Neither England nor France care a straw for the Confederate States or the United States; but if we will they only let them have thFrance care a straw for the Confederate States or the United States; but if we will they only let them have the cotton and tobacco, will permit the blockade to remain till doomsday, and let us fight as long as we please; and when we are both tired, we can make friends or not, without concern of theirs, as best suits our convenience. We understand that the F