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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16,340 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 3,098 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2,132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,974 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,668 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,628 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,386 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,340 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 1,170 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 1,092 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 4, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for United States (United States) or search for United States (United States) in all documents.

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he Americans plunged into it with less concern than would have been shown by any European State in adopting a diplomatic quarrel. Though the people of the South were of the same flesh and blood with the people of the North, and connected with them by a thousand links of interest and feeling, the Northerners instantly heaped every conceivable opprobrium on the heads of the Southerners. If the reader will refer to any speech of any Manchester orator he will find the Government of the United States extravagantly eulogized for the very qualities of which it is now proved to be utterly destitute, and the Americans exalted beyond all other people on account of gifts which it is plain they never possessed. It is this, if the Americans wish to know the truth, which points the remarks of Englishmen on their civil war and its incidents. It is not that they are any worse or more foolish or more intemperate than was to be expected under the trials to which they have been exposed, but that
f Providence for a successful issue to the contest. The above resolutions were adopted unanimously. Hon. H. S. Foote, on behalf of the committee, offered the following rather as supplementary to the original report, some delay having occurred in preparing the same: Resolved, That we deem it matter of sincere and hearty gratulation that the people of the State of Tennessee have at last become almost unanimous in their determination to sustain, with all their energies, the Confederate States of the South in the war now pending; and we do especially rejoice over the fact now most manifest, that our brethren of East Tennessee are at this time equally resolved as ourselves to defend our inestimable rights and liberties against the bloody and ferocious despotism now existing in Washington city; and we do confidently hope that the day is not far distant when the patriotic citizens of the renowned Volunteer State shall, throughout our confines, exhibit once more those feelings o
rts and all sorts of pains and penalties for the presumed hostility of his Government to the United States. The world sees that the North has now treated the Southerners as rebels — we will not say e is either a belligerent right, or it is not, it is a violation of the treaties between the United States and foreign powers. Whence, then, the forbearance of England and France to violate the bloc way, they will not violate the blockade. Neither England nor France care a straw for the Confederate States or the United States; but if we will they only let them have the cotton and tobacco, will United States; but if we will they only let them have the cotton and tobacco, will permit the blockade to remain till doomsday, and let us fight as long as we please; and when we are both tired, we can make friends or not, without concern of theirs, as best suits our convenience. except from Southern harbors, they will then remind Mr. Lincoln that the blockade is a violation of treaties between the United States and foreign powers, and that as such they intend to treat it.
First Congressof the Confederate States of America.(called session.) Congress assembled yesterday at 12 M., in obedience to a proclamation of President Davis. issued September 3d, 1861, convening said body for the purpose of taking action on a bill empowering the President to make appointment in the Army and Navy, which had failed to be reported to him during the late session. Hon. Howell Cobb in the chair. The session was opened with prayer by Rev. Mr. Flynn,of Georgia. The roll being called, the following named members were ascertained to be present: From Alabama--Mr. Shorter. From Arkansas--Mr. Johnson. From Florida--Messrs. Moreton and Ward. From Georgia--Messrs. Howell Cobb and Thos. R. R. Cobb. From Louisiana--Mr. Declout. From Mississippi--Mr. Harris. From North Carolina--Mr. Craig. From South Carolina--Mr. Miles. From Texas--Messrs. Reagan, Hemphill, Waul, Oldham and Ochiltree. From Tennessee--Mr. Hughes.
Executive Department Richmond, September, 2d, 1861. the following persons have been appointed by the Governor Commissioners for superintending the election of His of President and Vice-President of the Confederate States, to wit: Accomac — W. H. B. Curtis, T A T Joynes, Edward O Finny. Albemarle — T J. Randolph, S. F. Lake, J. J. Bowcock. Alexandria County--Dr. H. S. Wander, James T. Ball, Anthony Frazier. Alexandria City — J. Morgan Johnson, W. N. Brown, J Buckingham. Alleghany — W. G. Holloway, Heay Roberson, Colonel S. Carpenter. Amelia — W F C Gregory, Edward W. Eggleston, R A Featherson. Amherst — Paurus Powell, W. A. Richardson, J. D. Davis. Appomattox — Thomas H. Flood, L. E. Chestham, Robert labell. Augusta — Jacob Baylor, Benjamin Crowford, Thomas J. Michie Barnour--Col. D. E. Auville, L. D. Morrell, James T. Hartman. Bath — William H. Terrill, S. A. Porter, A H. McClintie. Bedford — E D Buford, Wm A Wingfield, L. C. Art
provides, "That the qualified valors of the Commonwealth who may be absent from the counties or corporations of their residence in the military service of the State, on the day of election for Electors of President and Vice President of the Confederate States, may vote in the said elections, at such place or places within their encampment as the commands at such encampment shall designate, whether the said encampment shall be within the limits of the State or not. For each place of voting the coperform the duties required of, and be liable to the penalties imposed upon, such officers, under the election laws of the State. The said Commissioners shall cause polls to be opened for the Electors of President and Vice President of the Confederate States." One Elector for each Congressional District established by the Convention and two for the at large are to be elected and the electionist be by general ticket, and to take place on the Wednesday in November next. George W. Munf
Martin and Andrews, be unconditionally surrendered to the Government of the United States, in terms of full capitulation. And it is stipulated and agreed by the con In witness whereof, we, the said Stringham and Butler, on behalf of the United States, and the said Barron, Martin and Andrews, representing the forces at Hatterthis twenty-ninth day of August, A. D. 1861, and of the independence of the United States the eighty-fifth year. [Signed] S. H. Stringham, Flag-Officer Atl Major-Gen. U States Army, Commanding. S. Barron, Flag-Officer Confederate States Navy, Commanding Naval Forces Virginia and North Carolina. Wm. F. Manited States Navy, and at present holding a commission in the army of the Confederate States, and in charge of the medical department of Forts Hatteras and Clark, thag, the Henry C. Rogers, of New York, and two light- boats, belonging to the United States, but in the employment of the Confederates, with miscellaneous cargoes.
roperty and production of the country. The real and personal values in the United States reach the vast aggregate of sixteen thousand millions of dollars; and in thon and the derangement of business occasioned by it, were the people of the United States in a better condition to sustain a great contest than now. Under theseas speedily as practicable in the several cities and principal towns of the United States, in order that all citizens who desire to subscribe to the loan may have tht any sum which they may wish to invest in the loan to the Treasurer of the United States at Washington, or to either of the Assistant Treasurers at Boston, New Yorkof all persons in the State of Missouri, who shall take up arms against the United States or who shall be directly proven to have taken active part with their enemie should refrain from the commission of any offence against the laws of the United States. The statement that Mr. Johnson is a nephew of Gen. Johnston is an entire
Grand Lodge of the United States Loop Philadelphia Aug. 31 --A meeting of the officers of the Grand Lodge, Grand Encampment of Pennsylvania, Order of Old Fellows, was held yesterday, when it was resolved that the Grand Representatives he directed to attend the session of the Grand Lodge of the United States at Baltimore, on the 16th of September. Grand Lodge of the United States Loop Philadelphia Aug. 31 --A meeting of the officers of the Grand Lodge, Grand Encampment of Pennsylvania, Order of Old Fellows, was held yesterday, when it was resolved that the Grand Representatives he directed to attend the session of the Grand Lodge of the United States at Baltimore, on the 16th of September.