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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 205 205 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 134 124 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 116 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 114 4 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 102 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 98 14 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 97 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 83 39 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 79 9 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 67 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 6, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for New Bern (North Carolina, United States) or search for New Bern (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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d from it by Pamlico Sound, is thirty miles distant from the main land of Hyde, is ninety miles distant by water from Washington, and about the same distance from Newbern. At the time the Federal fleet arrived at Hatteras, Col. Martin, the recently elected Colonel of the 4th Regiment, was in command. Maj. Andrews, of Goldsboro', efficient battery, he determined to give the enemy battle. About the time the action commences, Com. Barron. Col. Bradford, and Major Andrews, reached there from Newbern. We learn that Col. Bradford remarked, before leaving Newbern, that he knew the fort was indefensible before a strong force, but he intended to defend it or die Newbern, that he knew the fort was indefensible before a strong force, but he intended to defend it or die in the attempt. The attack of the fleet commenced at nine o'clock on Wednesday, and was continued until sundown, the two little batteries gallantly replying to them all day. At night the fleet seemed to haul off. We had two or three small steamers lying in sight in the Sound, ready to rescue our brave boys — the whole force mig
in his vessel with safety, with the troops, who were pleased with his care and conduct. He still remains at the inlet. In fine, General, I may congratulate you and the country upon a glorious victory in your department, in which we captured more than 700 men, 25 pieces of artillery, a thousand stand of arms, a large quantity of ordnance stores, provisions, three valuable prizes, two light-boats and four stand of colors, one of which had been presented within a week by the ladies of Newbern, N. C., to the "North Carolina Defenders." By the goodness of that Providence which watches over our nation, no one of the fleet or army was in the least degree injured. The enemy's loss was not officially reported to us, but was ascertained to be 12 or 15 killed and died of wounds, and 35 wounded." Captain Jardine, of the New York Ninth Regiment, Lieut. Larned, and Mr. Durivage, a volunteer aid, are the correct names of three gentlemen spoken of in complimentary terms by General But